Basement Sewer Plumbing

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-06-09, 05:35 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bolingbrook, IL
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Basement Sewer Plumbing

Hi,

Based on my reading of some of the other posts on here I think that I have a problem with the plumbing work I have done so far in my basement.

I've attached a picture of it below. The large pipes are 4" diameter and the small ones are 2". The 4" PVC connects to a 4" cast iron pipe at the bottom of the picture. The 4" then empties into a sump (about 12" from the bottom of the pic). There is a pump in the sump that pumps the waste up, across the basement and connects into main waste stack on the other side of the house.

I think my problem is with the placement of the toilet. Am I allowed to place the toilet on top of the line as I have done or should I do something different? If I need to fix this does anyone have any suggestions on what I could do (I don't have a lot of space to work with here.)

 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-06-09, 07:20 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 4,639
Received 19 Votes on 18 Posts
Need a picture!

Suggest you post the picture to photobucket or a similar site then link to it from here.
 
  #3  
Old 08-06-09, 08:12 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bolingbrook, IL
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Here, let me try that picture again...

 
  #4  
Old 08-07-09, 07:16 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 166
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Well this whole bathroom is not to code as far as the venting and fittings go. It will probably drain ok but if you wanted to make it legal you'd have to basically rebuild all of that. I'm curious what kind of shower you're putting in. If it's a fiber glass shower pan you'll want to box out the concrete around that stand pipe. Normally the level of the pvc standpipe is lowere than the top of the concrete. Also how do you know the drain is exactly centered if you are using a pan?
 
  #5  
Old 08-07-09, 09:01 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bolingbrook, IL
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
SDPlumber,

I need to make this plumbing meet code as I will be having it inspected by the city before I cover it up. I'm not thrilled about the idea of re-building it, but I'd rather do it now whilst its all open. This is the first time I have done this so I'm willing to re-do it if necessary.

I am planning to use a shower that fits in the corner of the room (It looks like a square with the corner in the center of the room chopped off). The drain for the shower needs to be 12" from the drywall surface of both walls. It is very close to that at the moment and I have some flexiblity on where I place the walls to make sure I get it right. I can cut the standpipe down if I need to. I deliberately left it longer than it needed to be (easier to cut it than make it longer!)

Could you be a bit more specific about which venting strategies and fittings are not to code? I was pretty sure I had the venting right. (Sink is wet vented, shower vents with the vent shown in the picture, toilet is within 3 ft of the sump which has a vent.). To be clear, the sink will actually be located a few feet to the left of where that pipe is shown. I just brought the pipe out where I did to reduce the concrete cutting.

This is a small bathroom and its not easy to fit everything in there, especially since the city requires 4" pipe underground (not sure if that is a national or local code).
 
  #6  
Old 08-07-09, 03:25 PM
shacko's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Baltimore County Maryland
Posts: 2,138
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Plumbing Rough-In

Your picture is not that clear, but are those 1 1/2 lines that you have comming up through the slab? if so thats a no-no, needs to be 2in. Is that a double wye you have, another no-no, you can't lay them flat on a sanitary system, like the other post said, thats all got to come out if you plan on passing code. BTW depending where you live you may have to put a trap primer on a floor drain.
 
  #7  
Old 08-07-09, 03:57 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bolingbrook, IL
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the feedback,

The pipes coming up through the slab are 2".

I'm sorry to hear about that double wye. I can probably figure out another way to route everything, but replacing that is going to cost me a lot in fittings.

What is a trap primer? The floor drain is an existing feature in the basement. It has a trap (cast iron) that is under the concrete that I have not broken up. The drain it's self is actually about 18" further up the line that I have labeled "Floor Drain"
 
  #8  
Old 08-08-09, 12:50 PM
shacko's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Baltimore County Maryland
Posts: 2,138
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Plumbing Rough-In

A trap primer is a device that feeds water to a drain that may lose its seal. If you are trying to get your install up to code and get it inspected, you may be required to install one.

Its to late now, but you should have made your cut-out wider, easier to patch concrete then to work in that too small ditch. BTW I missed that 4x2 tee you have in the ditch, that needs to be a wye or combine fitting, sorry.
 
  #9  
Old 08-08-09, 09:31 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bolingbrook, IL
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ok I've done some more reading and taken all the comments so far into account. It think I understand what I need to do, but I want to check (before I glue everything together this time!). Does the new design in this picture make sense?

(I'll ask the city inspector about the trap primer)

 
  #10  
Old 08-09-09, 09:49 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 166
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
In order to vent the shower and stool the vent for these fixtures must be installed through a "wye" fitting that is on the same branch off of the main sewer as the fixture you are venting...the way I understand it. I've only heard of a 4" pipe requirement only if there are 4 or more stools being drained on that line. If that's your local code that is way overkill and ridiculous. You have to keep the main sewer 4" in this case because that is what is coming from the floor drain(you can't go from 4" to 3" back to 4").

There's no reason you can't use a 4x3 wye for the stool and a 4x2 wye for the lav/shower. In your new diagram you'd have to re-vent the stool and shower. You can set a 4x3 wye off for the stool. Off of THAT wye set a 3x2 wye with the 2'' going off for the vent. Set a 90 off of the end of the wye for your stool riser.

Install a 4x2 wye farther up the line to drain both the lav/shower. Set a 2'' wye on the 2'' line with the branch going to the lav and the run of the wye going to the shower.

This might not even work depending on your elevation, wall placements, etc... But it would be legal. There are other legal ways of running this bathroom but this would be the easiest in my opinion. You might have to bust more concrete for this.

Also I don't know if you can consider the vent for the sewage ejector a vent for the stool.
 
  #11  
Old 08-09-09, 01:41 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bolingbrook, IL
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the help,

I think I am getting closer to a good design now.

I have moved the shower drain to the line that the shower is on and reduced the "wye" connections for the lav and shower to 4x2 instead of 4x4. That will save me some $ on fittings as well.

I also added a vent for the stool. I'll check with the city tomorrow to see if that is necessary.

The 4" pipe requirement comes from my city. They require that as much as possible underground pipes must be 4". It seems like overkill to me, but that's the code.

How does this latest design look?


 
  #12  
Old 08-09-09, 08:17 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 166
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Looks perfect. That's the right concept. Technically on the 2" wye and the 3x2 wye the "branch" should be rolled up as much as elevation allows. No horizontal pipe should be ran up in the concrete. If you aren't able to roll up at all the inspector won't say anything and it will still drain fine.

What kind of program did you have to use to make your diagrams? If I knew it might be easier for me to explain things.
 
  #13  
Old 08-09-09, 08:26 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bolingbrook, IL
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for all your help!

Actually I used MS Paintbrush to make the drawings

Its low tech, but it works well enough for me!
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: