Basement Shower Drain/Sump Pump

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-11-09, 12:50 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: US
Posts: 158
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Basement Shower Drain/Sump Pump

I posted this in the thread i created for putting in a tile shower and it was recommended i try here for this question.

I was getting ready to put the drainage in the floor for a tile shower I am going to install. On one of the 42" walls is where I am going to put the valves for the shower. On the other side of this wall is my utility room which contains my sump pump. While dry fitting the connections my sump pump went off which is just on the other side of wall and runs currently into the city sewer ( we do have a permit for this) while we get grass established. When the sump pump went off a good part of the water came back into the line where the shower would drain. Is this going to be an issue do you think? I would say it was a half gallon that came out of the line while i was working on it. If it is going to be an issue could one put a backflow flap valve (not sure of the correct name) under the flooring(this will be tiled over so i will never have access to it again) to prevent it from flowing into the shower drain or will this cause hair and crap to get caught in there and be a plug hazard?

Thanks for the help.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-11-09, 03:22 PM
shacko's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Baltimore County Maryland
Posts: 2,138
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Shower Drain

Without knowing what you have hooked up with your sump pump the only guess I can make is you have something running backwards. If you don't resolve this you will have nothing but problems when you are done with your shower, sorry.
 
  #3  
Old 08-11-09, 06:51 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: US
Posts: 158
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi Shacko.
I am not sure what exactly you are looking for as far as what i have hooked up but I took a couple of pictures and maybe that will help.
This picture is the line that was originally pulled in and put in place when the house was built. I simply cut the cap off.

IMG_5627 on Flickr - Photo Sharing!

The wall you see is the wall I need to go under for my drain as the shower is on the other side.
The wall you are lookin at above, is on the right hand side of the below picture. Hopefully this helps orient you a bit.

IMG_5628 on Flickr - Photo Sharing!

The PVC T you see in the middle of the picture, the sump comes in on the left hand side of the T. All of this was originally put in when the house was built.
Hopefully tha will help give you an idea as to what I am up against. From the original drain to my new drain location will require about a total of 3 feet of additional PVC.
Does that help?
Thanks again.
 
  #4  
Old 08-12-09, 03:18 PM
shacko's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Baltimore County Maryland
Posts: 2,138
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I still lean toward something going backwards. Have you checked the fall on that underground line? should be 1/4 inch per ft. if you have negative fall that would explain the water running out. Is there any place to change the discharge of the sump? I still think pumping into that under slab rough-in without knowing how its run could cause the water to back up when the pump turns off.

Putting in a backwater valve is not a good idea; they have to be accessible for service, best I can come up with.
 
  #5  
Old 08-13-09, 05:38 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: US
Posts: 158
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I have checked that line. It is not a 1/4 per foot. it is nearly level best I can tell. Unfortunately being that is under the concrete i have no real way of getting to it to try and better slope it. The best I could do is make sure that the additional line i am putting in meets 1/4" per foot or slope it more to make sure it runs out. If i were to find a better spot to discharge the sump do you think it would then work out? That is what I was thinking that the backwater valve would not work. I have had to service many in my past as well. Darn...
 
  #6  
Old 08-13-09, 01:58 PM
shacko's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Baltimore County Maryland
Posts: 2,138
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Rough-In

The best you can do is to force as much pitch on the existing lines as you can. If you can find a spot to discharge your sump line that dosen't go thru. your under slab pipes that you're are working on you should be good to go. Luck
 
  #7  
Old 08-14-09, 03:24 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 4,646
Received 19 Votes on 18 Posts
I can't see how there would be a problem with the drains. The drain lines run into the sump pit, then the pump there pumps the water up and out. The question I have is how the water that's being pumped up and out ends up coming back through your shower drain. There should be an "air gap" there, basically your sump pit.

I would look into your sump pit as the pump is running. Is water flowing back into the pit from the discharge pipe once the pump shuts off? Or is the water sloshing around in the pit just cresting over the shower drain pipe.

The lack of 1/4" fall may affect the drainage of the shower a bit, but it shouldn't have anything to do with water running the opposite direction.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: