can I run pex straight to fixtures?

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  #1  
Old 09-10-09, 03:20 AM
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can I run pex straight to fixtures?

Ok, so I got bit by the pex bug and realize it is going to save me so much on my plumbing install. well I don't mind buying the tool. tools are something I don't have a problem with, and the fittings really wont cost a lot for this house, its not big, and I will be doing a T&B style. well I am looking more into it and they have all these fittings to go right up to the faucet. so basically no shutoff.

Can I run all my lines right up to the faucets etc. without having a shutoff on each line. I realize that would be more convenient to have shutoffs, but this way I wouldn't need expensive SS lines and shutoffs. Or are these direct connects for manifold types wehre you have centrally located shutoffs as is. I was thinking I would route one shutoff for hot water right past the tank, and then locate a cold water shutoff through an access panel in the utility room. That way if there was a burst or leak, water could be shutoff quickly as the utility room is centrally located in the home on the main level. Thanks.

I figured this would be easy to search, but for some reason I couldn't find this.

PS toilets would definitely have their own shutoff for obvious reasons.
 
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Old 09-10-09, 12:42 PM
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You probably couldn't find it because no one would recommend it. Even if it's not against any codes, it's not the best idea in the world.
 
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Old 09-10-09, 12:58 PM
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And several folks here (myself included) have stated they would stub out the last part with copper. Though someone said galvanized as well...but he was just a crazy old plumber...lol (sorry to whoever said that in the other post...j/k)
 
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Old 09-10-09, 03:16 PM
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Well, OK I should explain. I am flipping a place, and though I am not a judgmental person, we are in a rather rural location of less discerning folks. I think a large yard and a garage is higher on their priorities than top quality looks under the vanity. I realize it would look much more professional to have a copper stubout with a quarter turn shutoff leading to an SS line to the fixture. However, flipping in mind, I am looking for a reliable, (I do take pride in my work, functionality wise at least) quick, and CHEAP!!! way to do this. I probably wouldn't do copper but if you guys MUST suggest I don't just pipe pex to the fixture, I will pex it to a shutoff and then use SS lines.
Or are you guys on board to use say pex to pex qtr turn and then pex to fixture, or still gotta use SS line for your professional recommendations?

When I saw those fixture to pex fittings though I just thought that was the coolest thing I have ever seen. Also on a side thought, I found sleeves that would work for stubbing pex out to the toilet shutoff to give it a more classy look, do you guys frown on those too?

Mainly I want to have a solid effective system, but as far as professional appearance, I really don't care what it looks like under the vanity.

This is what I am talking about
 
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Old 09-10-09, 03:38 PM
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I think cutoffs are really required..though you may not have inspectors in your area. If the PEX is well secured and you get good 1/4 turn shutoffs, then using the flex lines to the fixtures would be just fine with me. SS preferred, but even the braided would work. Not much price diff.

Not a fan of the plastic cutoffs if thats what you meant.

No PRO..just a DiY guy who has seen too many shortcuts.
 
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Old 09-10-09, 03:49 PM
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No, I was talking about using metal shutoffs, but they have pex in pex out, so then I could use pex right off the shutoff to the fixture by way of that adapter, but really I would like to just pex straight to the adapter with out a shutoff, to eliminate more parts. I guess though depending on the setup, the pex line would not be well secured or cocked to a direction that would lead to failure, thus the flexible line takes up that unknown angle/distance depending on different fixtures and setups. We are talking little difference overall in price, Is just with three sinks, thats 6 shutoffs, and lines, that could potentially be gone, less work, little more in my pocket. But based on what you guys are saying, I think I will just stubout some pex, to a quarter turn and use a flex line. Not gonna use copper, but at least ill have the shutoffs and the flex lines. Unless there is ANYONE out there that still wants to confirm that though my original idea may be cutting corners, it if is just as safe, then I'm still down. But thanks guys so far, you've shed some light on my issue.
 
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Old 09-10-09, 04:10 PM
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mj..you'll never get a "flip this house" show..you are too smart and have too much integity!

Good on ya!
 
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Old 09-10-09, 09:28 PM
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Haha, yah that and when the show ended, they would total up the expenses and show the ACTUAL profit. nobody would want to keep watching!
 
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Old 09-15-09, 09:59 AM
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Lightbulb Just a comment

When I did all of my plumbing (3500 s.ft. with 5 baths) I still put shutoffs on every fixture even though there are shut offs for every line at the manifolds. The reasoning being there are many times when you just may want to shut off the fixture( sink, toilet, etc) to do some quick repairs,ie, replace a faucet set. It is much more convenient to just reach under the sink than to go to the utility room, shut the line off, return, open the valve to drain the water and release the pressure, do the repair, then reverse the entire process. For $10 total per appliance, why would you not? You have already saved the big money on the materials and installation costs, so go ahead and spend the extra few bucks and do it right (and by code). If you had used any other material, then there would be no question you would have to do it anyway, so it is no even an added expense.
 
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