Thread Wrapping with Teflon Tape.


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Old 11-22-09, 06:43 PM
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Question Thread Wrapping with Teflon Tape.

How may times are you supposed to wrap the teflon tape around the threads of a pipe? I just put together some new 1/2" galvinized pipe in my house today and I have some small leaks. I wrapped the teflon tape around the threads about twice. Does it make any difference what direction it is warpped? Also I really cranked the pipes to tighten them. Is is possible to over tighten them and cause a leak?

Thank you for any help you can give me on this, it is greatly appreciated!!
 
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Old 11-22-09, 06:50 PM
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You want to wrap the tape so that when you tighten you aren't unwrapping the tape.A couple of thicknesses should be enough.Also you want to wrap the threads that are actually contacted by the other part,if most of the tape is exposed it isn't doing any good.
 
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Old 11-22-09, 07:17 PM
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Teflon tape works easily on fine threads, but on galvanized pipe, you need quite a bit of it. 2 wraps probably isn't enough since the threads are so deep.

When I join 1/2" galvanized pipe, I usually use either 4-6 wraps of teflon tape, or use pipe dope.


Also, for what it's worth... I wouldn't recommend installing any new galvanized pipe. It rusts out and clogs up too easily. Wherever possible, it's best to replace it with copper, PEX, or CPVC. If it's just a short nipple, you may be able to get away with a brass nipple.
 
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Old 11-22-09, 07:41 PM
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Thank you so much for the responses. I will need to take the pipes out, rewrap and reinstall to fix the leaks. I have heard of copper piping but what is PEX and CPVC? If I were to have these installed to replace my very old galvanized water pipes would I get a big increase in water pressure?
 
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Old 11-22-09, 08:22 PM
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PEX and CPVC are plastic pipe of two different materials.

If you have old galvanized pipe in your house you have a ticking time bomb.Galvanized will rust from the inside and first clog with rust later rust to failure.

You probably will get more pressure from plastic replacement because of rust build up being eliminated.
 
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Old 11-22-09, 08:38 PM
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Are the PEX and CPVC acceptable for installation anywhere in the country or do some cities not allow these materials? I am in the Chicago area.
 
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Old 11-23-09, 07:09 AM
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Check with your local bldg. dept. before using PEX, PVC or CPVC in an interior application. Some places allow some, or all, and some places won't allow any.
 
 

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