cutting PVC pipe

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Old 11-26-09, 06:25 AM
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cutting PVC pipe

does any recommend a type of sawzaw blade that would cut pvc pipe that would not make the pvc shaving that a standard blade makes.I was thinking a diamond blade or a carbine blade? those shaving get into some of our 90% heaters ,we clean the pipe but even a small amount is not good , thanks if anyone has an idea for me ...
 
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Old 11-26-09, 12:54 PM
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I don't know of any blade that dosen't make shavings of some type. The only thing that would work is a tubing cutter with a plastic type cutting wheel, but they are expensive and a PITA to use; haven't used mine in over 20 years, luck.
 
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Old 11-26-09, 01:08 PM
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What about using a hot blade? Like heating a knife with a torch or using a heated knife like they use to cut rigid pink polystyrene. It will leave you one heck of a burr but it should all stay stuck together.
 
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Old 11-26-09, 01:24 PM
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If the pipe is 1" diameter or less, a hand held PVC cutter!! They simply ratchet a blade thru the pipe and there are NO SHavings (or sawdust). Try Oatey.com or Orbit.com -- haven't looked, but I'm betting you can find it.
 
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Old 11-26-09, 06:59 PM
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I think the OP is referring to 99% efficient exhaust piping which is either 3 or 4" pvc. You may use one of those wire saws and a vacuum while you are cutting. Less shavings, but finer shavings.
 
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Old 11-27-09, 04:07 PM
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You can melt your way through PVC with "builders line". An old trick when you cannot get a sawblade in at your work area, like down in narrow deep trenches. This is not theory. It works. And it automatically cuts through, square. You just loop it around the pipe and rapidly pull back and forth, alternating which string end you pull on. Like trying to start a fire without matches.
 
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Old 11-27-09, 05:46 PM
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Originally Posted by ecman51` View Post
You can melt your way through PVC with "builders line". An old trick when you cannot get a sawblade in at your work area, like down in narrow deep trenches. This is not theory. It works. And it automatically cuts through, square. You just loop it around the pipe and rapidly pull back and forth, alternating which string end you pull on. Like trying to start a fire without matches.
I saw this demonstrated on Ask This Old House and does seem to work.

Very not safe probably but years ago at a picture tube rebuild shop I saw them cutting off the necks of picture tubes with a Nichrome wire between two insulated arms, imagine an 'u' shaped sling shot with a wire tightly across the top that glowed white hot. The Nichrome wire was just plugged into a 120v receptacle. Not recommending it but something similar perhaps off an isolation transformer or car battery would work but how safe I can't say.
 
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Old 11-27-09, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
I saw this demonstrated on Ask This Old House and does seem to work.
More than 'seems'. Does. I've actually done it. You first hear of the trick, then do it, then go, "How in the world can something like string!......."

Very not safe probably but years ago at a picture tube rebuild shop I saw them cutting off the necks of picture tubes with a Nichrome wire between two insulated arms, imagine an 'u' shaped sling shot with a wire tightly across the top that glowed white hot. The Nichrome wire was just plugged into a 120v receptacle. Not recommending it but something similar perhaps off an isolation transformer or car battery would work but how safe I can't say.
Like an electrified cheese slicer?
 
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Old 11-27-09, 07:39 PM
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A white hot cheese slicer, hot enough to melt glass. Wouldn't have to be that hot for plastic.
 
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Old 12-01-09, 09:16 AM
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As mentioned a ratchet cutter works and they handle pipe up to 2" that I've seen. As for larger pipe, I have used a regular blade for years and then just cleaned off the shavings and run a rag through the inside of the pipe to clean it. I don't know what constitutes "a small amount" but using this method I don't even see any on my finger when I run it across the inside of the pipe.

Also a cut-off blade for a 4" grinder makes a clean cut but creates a lot of very fine dust that ends up deposited a ways up inside the pipe. Running a rag through the pipe does a pretty good job of removing a lot of it but it's so fine that I cannot say I have ever removed all of it.

I prefer a regular blade and rag method because the shavings produced are large enough that you can make sure you have removed them all before installation.
 
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