Is it possible to move my water meter radio myself?

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Old 12-01-09, 01:34 PM
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Is it possible to move my water meter radio myself?

I have a typical looking water meter with a wire running up to a radio and it's nailed/screwed to a piece of wood. I want to replace this piece of wood with another piece of wood but otherwise not move the radio at all. The radio seems held on from inside with what appears to be a metal magnet or some such way to open the front panel. Calling the utility company to move this is a hassle but perhaps the only legal way. Otherwise I suppose I could literally cut it off from behind, still attached to that piece of wood, but that seems silly.

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Old 12-01-09, 02:46 PM
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Anything pertaining to that meter belongs to the supplier, if you do anything to it or damage it could cost you big bucks.

I think your best bet is to decide where you want to put your replacement wood and call the utility, they should move it for you, luck.
 
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Old 12-03-09, 10:32 AM
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I moved my meter and transmitter and never had any issues with my municipal water supplier. I was careful not to break the "circuit" but figured I couldn't do any real harm to the equipment.

I guess the decision is yours but if I were you I would attempt it and see what happens. If you have to call someone b/c you can't do it yourself (provided you don't break something) then you're no worse off than had you called them to begin with.
 
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Old 12-03-09, 10:45 AM
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Is it possible to move my water meter radio myself?

Depending on the set-up you could get into trouble.

The cover may be part of the circuit and opening the door could set off an alarm or radio transmission. Some utilities frown on someone interfering with the metering system and now are putting in controls. A common practice is for people trying to disconnect the system temporarily is tried to reduce the utility bills. - Sort of like illegally tapping off before the electric meter.

If you are not moving the meter, but just temporarily moving the transmitter box to a different location, there may be no charge and it is probably a common situation when houses are resided.
 
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Old 12-03-09, 12:12 PM
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Thanks for the answers. I wonder if I should have somebody come in or not. The meter is attached to a piece of non-treated wood against what has historically been a completely bone-dry basement wall. In four years no signs at all of mold, completely exposed to the room. I am about to close that in somewhat with walls although they will be hollow with air moving above and behind them. I'd planned on insulating just up to the wood (foam) but leaving it untouched, essentially mirroring how it's been for the last four years. I just wish they'd used pressure-treated lumber.
 
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Old 12-03-09, 12:35 PM
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A telephone call to the utility is pretty close to free. They can tell you if what you want to do is okay or if you need one of their people to do the work. They will also tell you if there would be a charge if they did the work.
 
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Old 12-03-09, 12:43 PM
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Is it possible to move my water meter radio myself?

If that is the case and you are just trying to replace untreated wood with treated wood, I would just do nothing and keep it in mind for the future, when you may be into some exterior residing or modifying.

Treated new growth lumber may not last much longer than old growth (more dense) lumber. Much of the treated lumber is not the good heartwood, but is the softer, more permeable portion that will accept the chemicals easier and faster. The treated offers no advantage for water/moisture entry and since it is visible you can see the condition of the wood and decide what to do then. If the water/moisture does not get in now, why change it and then hope the new will be any better?

Dick
 
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