Washing Machine Hot Water Valve Body Broke


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Old 12-07-09, 07:36 AM
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Washing Machine Hot Water Valve Body Broke

Just by luck I was home and noticed my cat licking water from the top of the washing machine. Also lucky there was a plastic laundry basket on top of the machine which kept the leak from flying all over the laundry room.

Anyways: Two-year old house - new plumbing, a recessed Oatey washing machine supply box in my laundry room wall. The hot water valve body broke right where the washing machine hose connects to the valve. The entire end just apparently fractured. (Bad casting from crappy Chinese foundry?) Fortunately the rest of the valve works properly and I was able to shut it off.

As I understand it, the only thing I can do to fix this is to open up the wall right below the box in order to get to the valve, correct? Thanks!
 
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Old 12-07-09, 07:45 AM
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Valve

Tell us more about the valve. What kind of pipe? (Copper, Galvanized, Pex, cpvc?) Can you see where the valve connects to the pipe?
 
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Old 12-07-09, 07:54 AM
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The valve connects to a copper pipe running down to the basement where it connects to a Pex line so I'm assuming a compression fitting. Unfortunately I can't see the actual connection from valve to pipe which is why I assumed I would need to open the wall. I know these boxes are roughed-in and a bear to work on. Thanks!
 
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Old 12-07-09, 09:53 AM
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Valve

If you solder a new valve to the copper line, be sure to disassemble the valve to remove any rubber or plastic parts to avoid heat damage.
 
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Old 12-09-09, 01:50 PM
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Well, I replaced the valve after opening up the wall. Instead of soldering a new connection I used a compression fitting and it seems to be working just fine. I think when I seal up the wall I'll be leaving an access panel there!
 
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Old 12-09-09, 05:18 PM
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Generally speaking it is not considered good practice to use compression fittings in unaccessable areas. Installing the access panel is a good idea.
 
 

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