Can water pressure at faucets vary??

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  #1  
Old 01-03-10, 06:04 PM
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Can water pressure at faucets vary??

I'm curious about something that has been the case with my house since I've owned it. Water pressure will sometimes drop at a running faucet, as if others were suddenly turned on, but I know for fact that none are....nor is the washing machine running or anything like that. When I've noticed this happening with the shower running, the water temperature gets colder as if a faucet were turned on and its pulling water away, or as if the washing machine was turned on and being filled- though, once again, I know for fact no other member fo the household is using anything.

This only happens occasionally, and it only drops for a few seconds, exactly as if all other faucets were turned on at once, then suddenly turned back off.

I'm on city water, and have no pressure regulating device.

Is this normal? Any thoughts as to why this happens??

Appreciate any input,

Visser
 
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Old 01-03-10, 06:33 PM
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If you're on city water with no PRV, there's no telling what your pressure set up is. I would install a PRV asap. Especially if you don't know what your initial pressure is. It could be dangerous to have too much pressure or fluctuation in pressure from the city.
 
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Old 01-03-10, 10:13 PM
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Thanks for responding so quickly. My house and my neighbors all have very low water pressure, so we have never had a concern about it being too high. Now that you mention it, installing a PRV is probably a very good idea, and it sounds like that would protect me against any pressure fluctuations from the city.

I think you answered my question that pressure fluctuation can indeed occur if I don't have a PRV.

Thanks!!
 
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Old 01-04-10, 03:58 AM
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Yeah if the city decides to increase the overall pressure to 120 psi so everyone will have good pressure, you and your neighbors without a PRV will be flooded once a pipe joint gives way.
But to your original pressure problem, if the overall pressure is low, and no one has prv's your neighbor's use of a shower, toilet, etc can cause your fluctuations. We find it a lot in shared well set ups.
 
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Old 01-04-10, 01:09 PM
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Question

Originally Posted by Visser View Post
Thanks for responding so quickly. My house and my neighbors all have very low water pressure, so we have never had a concern about it being too high. Now that you mention it, installing a PRV is probably a very good idea, and it sounds like that would protect me against any pressure fluctuations from the city.

I think you answered my question that pressure fluctuation can indeed occur if I don't have a PRV.

Thanks!!
You do not need a PRV! if you have low water pressure from the municipal supplier and your neighbors on the same main start using water your pressure is going to drop, that valve will do nothing. What you should do is ask your local jurisdiction if they have any plan to upgrade the system.
 
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Old 01-04-10, 01:24 PM
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I wasn't suggesting the PRV to solve his problem, but to prevent the municipality water change in pressure from an eventual surging. Our nearby city didn't have any proposed upgrades in their system, but when the DOT came through and widened the road, they turned off the water, depleting some of the houses up on the hill. When it came back on line, it hit with such force, several had flooded basements (finished basements). PRV's would have prevented that. Just a precaution.
 
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Old 01-07-10, 08:05 PM
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I like this quote

Originally Posted by shacko View Post
you do not need a prv! If you have low water pressure from the municipal supplier and your neighbors on the same main start using water your pressure is going to drop, that valve will do nothing. What you should do is ask your local jurisdiction if they have any plan to upgrade the system.
i agree with shacko! Be careful in how you spend your money especially when you do not have, too.
 
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Old 01-07-10, 08:09 PM
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Prv installation

Originally Posted by chandler View Post
if you're on city water with no prv, there's no telling what your pressure set up is. I would install a prv asap. Especially if you don't know what your initial pressure is. It could be dangerous to have too much pressure or fluctuation in pressure from the city.
i would not install asap a prv first and foremost his pressure should be tested and from that reading one can determine if a prv is needed or not. Prv are not inexpensive.
 
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Old 01-08-10, 04:29 AM
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PRV's run about $15, so what is the big expense? Did you really read my post? The PRV isn't to solve the problem. On any municipal water system your house should have a PRV. Who is to say the pressure can change at any time? So you have 40 psi today. Hey, I don't need a PRV. Tomorrow, the city installs a new pump and the pressure goes up to 100 psi. You want to take that $15 chance? Or do you want to rely on the city to give you a hokey dokey call and tell you to watch out, we're going to increase your pressure to a much higher pressure?
Again, it won't solve the initial problem of low pressure, but it won't degrade that pressure, either.
 
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Old 01-08-10, 11:56 AM
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Chandler, if you can purchase 3/4 inch pressure reducing valves for $15 I suggest that you buy them by the boxcar lot and then sell them at $25. You'll be able to retire next week. I think the lowest price I've ever seen for a 3/4 inch PRV is about $45 and $60 is more common.
 
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Old 01-08-10, 02:39 PM
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Furd, you're partially right. My bifocals jumped a line to pressure "relief" valve, which run about $12, versus the 3/4" pressure "regulating" or "reducing" valve at $31. Still a bargain as opposed to the disaster that can be caused by not having one.
 
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Old 01-08-10, 03:11 PM
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Wow...you must get an old guy discount...lol. Seriously..last time I had to get one...at a supply house mind you...it was bout $41 as I remember...and that was 4 yrs ago at least.

I read what you posted and it was clear it wasn't a fix..just a precaution...

I've thought about it here..but accessing the main line would be a major royal complete PITA.
 
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Old 01-08-10, 03:19 PM
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Nope, today's price at big orange is $31. I had to double check before I goofed again.
 
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