Running gas line for garage furnace

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Old 02-16-10, 03:18 PM
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Running gas line for garage furnace

Hello. Just had a question about running a gas line to my garage for a 45k Hot Dawg style heater.
I have an attatched garage and my gas line will be coming from the basement. I will be coming off of the main line that runs across the basement from my meter to my furnace area.
When I enter the garage from the basement with the line I will not be able to run inside a stud cavity to the ceiling because a bedroom partially overhangs the garage. Because of this the gas line will need to exit the wall and run exposed for about 4 feet horizontally before going up to the ceiling in a stud cavity. Is this a code violation running it this way?
If the line can be exposed does it need to be covered or painted?
Thanks for any advice.
 
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Old 02-16-10, 08:49 PM
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what are you using? Flex copper Black iron or Gastite flexible gas tubing?

If you are certified to use Gastite you can get a flange that goes thru walls which is legal


Black iron can probably run thru drywall and be ok. No need to paint black iron

Flex Copper pipe is not really ideal for gas unless its a limited amount of use and small amount of BTU

you can have a hvac installer install gastite or tracpipe or if you take the half hour certification session you can install it yourself


Ben Hvac-r Tech
 
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Old 02-16-10, 10:44 PM
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Thanks Ben. I was planning on using black iron since i don't have the ability to purchase the flexible line but your comment about the class has my interest.
If I go with black iron will there be an issue with the 4ft horizontal run on the outside of the drywall?
 

Last edited by Todd69gs; 02-16-10 at 11:04 PM.
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Old 02-17-10, 01:15 PM
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Shouldnt be a Problem but I dont know for sure. Make sure you use a flexible appliance connector from the pipe to the heater and secure the pipe to the wall with supports
 
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Old 02-18-10, 02:26 AM
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Unless you first do an engineering study of the existing gas piping and all current loads and then the study with the additional load you cannot know if the existing piping will be able to handle the increased load. Because of the very low pressures used with natural gas the pipe diameter, pipe length, number of fittings etc. becomes VERY important. Miscalculations can leave you with a hazardous condition or a system that cannot supply the needed flow to all appliances.

This chart will show you how to do the calculations. Although it is specifically for a generator the rules are the same. If there is any doubt always err on the side of larger piping rather than smaller.

Something else, unless you have a fair amount of experience in working with steel pipe I strongly suggest that you have an experienced (and licensed if your local codes require) gas fitter do this work. Unlike water piping where the only problem is a bit of water in case of a leak a gas leak CAN KILL YOU, YOUR FAMILY AND EVEN YOUR NEIGHBORS! Do NOT commence work without a permit from your local inspection authority and do not use the system without a final inspection.
 
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Old 02-18-10, 10:40 AM
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Originally Posted by furd View Post
Unless you first do an engineering study of the existing gas piping and all current loads and then the study with the additional load you cannot know if the existing piping will be able to handle the increased load. Because of the very low pressures used with natural gas the pipe diameter, pipe length, number of fittings etc. becomes VERY important. Miscalculations can leave you with a hazardous condition or a system that cannot supply the needed flow to all appliances.

This chart will show you how to do the calculations. Although it is specifically for a generator the rules are the same. If there is any doubt always err on the side of larger piping rather than smaller.

Something else, unless you have a fair amount of experience in working with steel pipe I strongly suggest that you have an experienced (and licensed if your local codes require) gas fitter do this work. Unlike water piping where the only problem is a bit of water in case of a leak a gas leak CAN KILL YOU, YOUR FAMILY AND EVEN YOUR NEIGHBORS! Do NOT commence work without a permit from your local inspection authority and do not use the system without a final inspection.

Yes I failed to mention proper sizing. I was just answering his initial Questions Best not to Tee off a line running to an existing appliance better to go as close to the source as possible if you have dryers,water heaters ovens stoves ECT running off gas besides your furnace.

also many locality's are now using 1 psi gas so if you have a Regulator you need to check and see if its large enough to supply the entire load
 
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Old 02-18-10, 10:44 AM
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also Todd is this in fact natural gas or propane? that makes a huge difference in sizing
 
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Old 02-18-10, 01:38 PM
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Its NG. Im aware of the sizing requirements. I will be coming off of the main feed line that runs the length of my basement which is 1" pipe. I'm pretty confident that a 1/2" line will suffice but I will see how many elbows I will be using and exactly how long the run will be and double check the numbers.
 
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Old 02-18-10, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Todd69gs View Post
Its NG. Im aware of the sizing requirements. I will be coming off of the main feed line that runs the length of my basement which is 1" pipe. I'm pretty confident that a 1/2" line will suffice but I will see how many elbows I will be using and exactly how long the run will be and double check the numbers.
half inch line should be plenty but go as close to the source as possible
 
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Old 02-18-10, 06:35 PM
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You can always build a small box around any exposed pipe to cover it.
 
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Old 03-11-10, 09:09 PM
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Just so I have this straight. You are adding a total of 4 feet? There are many things to consider. What is your delivery pressure? The most common is a 7" water column in the U.S. If yours is a 7" W.C. then you really need to consider the whole house's existing gas piping to see if you can add it safely. You can use the link "furd" had in his reply to find out. If it's too complicated. Go to service magic online and request a quote from a licensed plumber. It's free. As far as black iron - good choice. Paint it to keep it from rusting and keep it painted as time goes by. No code issues with what you're asking. Perfectly legal.
 
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