Plugging basement floor drain to add flooring


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Old 03-15-10, 06:18 PM
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Plugging basement floor drain to add flooring

Hi Folks,

I'm slowly remodeling my basement and have been putting off dealing with this floor drain. The house is a split-foyer, built in 1986. The lower half is an unfinished basement, with block walls and concrete slab. Most of the wall have been parged, studded out, etc, etc.

However I'm left with a floor drain in the center of the main living area that I need to seal up. It's completely PVC, no seepage holes, and drops down to a 'T' of 3 or 4" pipe. One side heads towards the outside concrete steps/stairwell with an (outside) floor drain as well. The other side shoots across the concrete and it's hard to say where it ends up.

Worth mentioning - I've never had a problem with water backing up this drain, and even after heavy rain the past few days, the 'T' is bone dry. The basement is "fully" plumbed - there's an existing full bath and kitchen.

Is it safe to simply cap this? Would you agree the best way is to bust up the concrete and glue a cap? Or is there an easier way?

Second - the concrete is obviously sloped in towards this region. I have heard of a self-leveling 'hydraulic' type cement used for leveling floors: any tips or suggestions on this?
 
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Old 03-15-10, 06:53 PM
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PS - there are no traps on the piping for either the inside or outside drain, but they do have the 'trap' type caps (see below picture).

We are on public sewer, and I've never smelt sewer from either drain. Downspots are all directed away from the house (and so I don't believe they are tied into the footing tile system).

 
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Old 03-16-10, 12:05 AM
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It's okay to cap the line, but it's important you have a floor drain near your water heater/furnace...it's a must have.
 
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Old 03-16-10, 02:43 AM
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Originally Posted by DUNBAR PLUMBER View Post
It's okay to cap the line, but it's important you have a floor drain near your water heater/furnace...it's a must have.
Thanks for the reply. Is this a must have for code? As it is now, the water heater is about 30' away, in a closet under the steps (not to say this was ever correct to begin with...). The main sewer pipe runs vertical through this stairwell, and so the heater's drain/overflow pan runs into the main sewer line here.

The condenser drain from the heat pump is hard plumbed into the adjacent bathroom sink drain.
 
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Old 03-16-10, 09:25 AM
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It sounds like the HVAC is covered in your situation, but the water heater needs some type of access to cover when it fails. T&P is supposed to have a drain of some type.


Water heaters leak, there's no doubt. 30' away will do tons of damage before it reaches the destination.
 
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Old 03-16-10, 06:40 PM
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Interesting how projects evolve eh?

I'm going to have to do some investigation as to where the sewer pipe runs after entering into the slab (after all the main vertical pipe is not but 2' from the heater). I have a feeling it's running beneath the stairwell wall.

FYI the T&P valve is plumbed into the drain that the water softener uses for back-flushes.

Thanks for the help!
 
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Old 03-17-10, 05:59 AM
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You wouldn't have to bust up the floor. You can get an expanding plug and use that to seal it. If you're not sure whjat that is, it's a rubber plug with a bolt threw the center. As you tighten the bolt the plug expands. I wouldn't worry too much about the water tank. When they go they don't burst they start to leak. If you're not right on the drain now it wouldn't matter either way. You could also put a tray under the heater if you're concerned.
 
 

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