Attn: Plumbers - How do I boost water pressure?


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Old 04-27-10, 08:39 PM
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Exclamation Attn: Plumbers - How do I boost water pressure?

Just moved into an older house (built in 1948) and the water pressure isn't the greatest. Called the water company and they sent someone out to check pressure. He said it was 35 psi, and normally you should have between 40 and 60 psi.

I asked him what to do to remedy this, and he quickly replied, "I don't know. I'm not a plumber."

So, for all you plumbers out there, what can I do to increase water pressure? Primarily, I like to have good pressure when I get a shower, so is there a way to add a booster on to the line coming out of the hot water tank?

Any advice would be great. Thanks,
 
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Old 04-27-10, 09:25 PM
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If you are on your own well, you could change the pressure switch on the well pump. If by chance the well pump is really old, it may not be able to raise the pressure to 60# and the extra pressure on the piping may cause a pipe failure. You could check to see what your gallons per minute are from the supply. If you have about 5gpm you may be able to change the shower head to get the soaking you like.
 
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Old 04-28-10, 07:27 AM
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No well. I'm on city water.
 
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Old 04-28-10, 08:26 AM
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If you initially get good water pressure but it decreases after a second or two then I suspect your pipes may be clogged or corroded. If you always have the same low pressure it could just be low pressure from the city or you may have a pressure regulator on the main line to your house.

If you attach a pressure gauge to a spigot read the pressure when you are not using any water in the house. Then open a faucet or spigot in the house and see what pressure the gauge reads. If both readings are about the same I'd look for a pressure regulator/reducer or it may be the cities supply pressure is low. The the pressure with the faucet open is significantly lower than I'd start saving up for new pipes.
 
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Old 04-28-10, 09:54 AM
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Should I maybe buy this?

Anybody ever use one of these?
 
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Old 04-28-10, 03:56 PM
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Originally Posted by mxbeeb View Post
Should I maybe buy this?

Anybody ever use one of these?
I would never put a pump on a system without finding out what was wrong first; if you have defective pipes you could blow them apart or create major leaks.
 
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Old 04-30-10, 12:17 AM
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You should familiarize yourself with the water piping in your house, in terms of materials & size. If it's old galvanized piping, you may be looking at a re-pipe. Over-sizing may help with low water pressure.
 
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Old 09-20-10, 08:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Pilot Dane View Post
If you initially get good water pressure but it decreases after a second or two then I suspect your pipes may be clogged or corroded. If you always have the same low pressure it could just be low pressure from the city or you may have a pressure regulator on the main line to your house.

If you attach a pressure gauge to a spigot read the pressure when you are not using any water in the house. Then open a faucet or spigot in the house and see what pressure the gauge reads. If both readings are about the same I'd look for a pressure regulator/reducer or it may be the cities supply pressure is low. The the pressure with the faucet open is significantly lower than I'd start saving up for new pipes.
I have a similar problem, how can I track down a 'clog'? the water pressure from the city is 90 PSI into the house. But when you turn on the kitchen faucet it dwindles down considerably.We do have ONE outside faucet that has 90 PSI but the other three are 35 PSI when water is flowing. We know that the problem is after the pressure regulator.
 
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Old 09-21-10, 05:54 AM
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Do you get similar pressure from both the hot and cold water?

You will have to start locating your pipes. Chances are the spigot with the good pressure ties into the water supply near the beginning while the slow running fixtures tie in further downstream. You restriction is probably somewhere in between. I usually find them at valves but sometimes a pipe can become pinched if it's hanger supports break free.
 
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Old 09-21-10, 09:17 AM
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Pami....sounds like a typical problem with the PRV if ALL inside faucets are affected...have you tried adjusting it? Though it may need replacement. It shouldn't let the static pressure build over what it is set too.
 
 

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