woodford model 14 leak diagnosis help


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Old 05-16-10, 08:30 AM
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Question woodford model 14 leak diagnosis help

hello doityourself forum experts/members!

this is my first post i hope you can help me. I have a nagging problem I want to fix. The outside faucet on one side of my house leaks when i turn it on. it seems to leak from behind the mounting flange, I have attached a link to the pdf parts diagram. It is on page 2.

http://www.woodfordmfg.com/Woodford/.../14CATALOG.pdf

the more i open it up the more it leaks. when i shut it off there is no discernible leak.

what do you think is the culprit?

i am confused by the water leaking seemingly from behind the mounting flange.

one other question it looks like it is possible to remove the valve stem assembly from the "front" after taking off the handle packing nut etc, correct?

if i had to guess i would think replacing the valve stem would solve the problem but i need to hear from more experienced people than me.

anyway many thanks if someone can help me with this quickly - i am tired of lugging pails of water to my plants!!!
 
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Old 05-16-10, 09:30 AM
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Any chance it froze? Was a hose left on in freezing weather? Theres not much that can go wrong...but the leak when its turned on would seem to indicate a split in the "housing"...the main body of the valve. (Its the only un-numbered part on the diagram.)
They also need to be installed with a slight downward slope to allow drainage.

You might be able to examine the interior once you remove the valve stem.

I've never messed with that exact brand...but I've seen it on other "freeze-proof" hose bibbs.
 
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Old 05-16-10, 09:46 AM
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yeah i think you may be right

Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
Any chance it froze? Was a hose left on in freezing weather? Theres not much that can go wrong...but the leak when its turned on would seem to indicate a split in the "housing"...the main body of the valve. (Its the only un-numbered part on the diagram.)
They also need to be installed with a slight downward slope to allow drainage.

You might be able to examine the interior once you remove the valve stem.

I've never messed with that exact brand...but I've seen it on other "freeze-proof" hose bibbs.
___________

thanks for the quick reply post. just bought the house so who knows if hose left on in winter, probably was?

I saw the reply below on another thread and that makes sense to me- the faucet extension pipe from the handle into the wall is split. That is why it doesn't leak when the handle is turned off.

I am just wondering if it is a screw in type and hopefully not sweated on. any way to tell other than just trying to screw off?

______

Don't those long "frost-free" faucets screw in? I'll bet there's a threaded connection somewhere back inside the wall, you just can't see it. I'll bet the long part of the faucet between where the washer sits and the outside of the wall is is split (the part that covers the long stem). So the washer still seats properly, but when you turn it on the leak is AFTER the washer, but inside the wall. I'd try wrapping a wrench around the outside part of faucet and try to unscrew it first. The longer the wrench handle, the more leverage you can get. I'd also run a razor blade around the caulk to help free it up, and then you are not trying to break the seal of the caulk AND the thread at the same time. IF it comes out clean, just take it with you to go get a replacement and replace it. If you break it, well, it's already busted....
 
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Old 05-16-10, 10:30 AM
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Personally, if no crawlspace or basement, I'd open up the wall somehow before I just started twisting. Repairing split and twisted plumbing is more work and expense than carefully cutting sheetrock and repairing afterwards or removing and replacing a few pieces of siding.

Not sure where that last part of your reply was copied from...but I think its bad advice.
 
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Old 05-16-10, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
Personally, if no crawlspace or basement, I'd open up the wall somehow before I just started twisting. Repairing split and twisted plumbing is more work and expense than carefully cutting sheetrock and repairing afterwards or removing and replacing a few pieces of siding.

Not sure where that last part of your reply was copied from...but I think its bad advice.


i don't feel comfortable just turning and hoping that is a recipe for disaster.

i just took another look. here is the dilemma, the house is on slab and the faucet is mounted on a brick outside wall. The inside wall comes out in the middle of the fiberglass shower so no way to cut a hole there to check it out. I guess this project will have to wait until i remodel the bathroom and yank that shower out.

i guess i could take the handle off and look inside the tube to confirm it is split.
 
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Old 05-16-10, 10:41 AM
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Ouch...well....I'd have to agree.

I sure wouldn't be using that faucet anymore. You can bet that not all the water is coming out the front.

I do think that cutting off the water supply and trying to do a visual on the inside of the "extension" would be worthwhile.
 
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Old 05-16-10, 10:47 AM
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thanks for the inputs very much appreciated
 
 

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