What type of outside faucet is this?


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Old 07-12-10, 08:23 PM
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What type of outside faucet is this?

I can't post a picture of this faucet. Is it a feature of this forum, or because this is my first post?

So I'll try to describe the faucet, but it won't be fun.

Visiting my mom's the other day and attempted to use an outside faucet. It sprayed a lot of water. I looked at the threads and noticed that there are two areas that are 'sheared' away. It's a clean shear, clearly the faucet was built this way. The two areas are directly opposite of each other. So when the hose is screwed on to the threads, there are now two gaps allowing water to spray out. My mom says it has always been this way (15 yrs!), and she just assumed the hose wasn't tight.

There is also a small 'dongle' extending down from the inside of the faucet. (I believe this has something to do with an anti-siphoning (or backflow) system.) But I can't understand how the sheared areas of the threads would play into anything. Perhaps there is another special attachment that must be threaded on?

thx
 
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Old 07-12-10, 08:34 PM
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Pictures must be uploaded to a hosting site like Photobucket and then linked here.

http://forum.doityourself.com/electr...your-post.html
 
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Old 07-13-10, 08:20 PM
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Faucet Picture

Thanks for the help. Here is a picture link: CIMG0541a on Flickr - Photo Sharing!
 
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Old 07-13-10, 08:28 PM
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Does it appear like there is a seam or gap where is can be unscrewed off? It does look like a anti-siphoning attachment. Maybe you could try with a wrench?

BTW - Nice firework pict!
 
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Old 07-14-10, 01:35 PM
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That definitely looks like an anti-backflow valve. Many of these are retro-fits which screwed onto the existing faucet. They usually had a small setscrew which locked them to the original faucet's threads. When the setscrew was tight, its head broke off, so the backflow preventer could not be removed (without destroying the threads of the original faucet).

It is the nature of the beast for a backflow preventer to spray a short burst of water if the water is turned off while the hose is under pressure (a hose-end sprayer is attached and is off, allowing the hose to remain pressured as the faucet is turned off).

From the pic, I can't tell if this is a factory backflow preventer or the add-on model, but either way, the spray burst when water is turned off is how they all work. It should NOT spray water when the faucet is in the open position, just as its being closed. If the hose end is unrestricted, then there should be no spray burst when closing the faucet either.
 
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Old 07-14-10, 02:03 PM
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That is nothing but a sill cxxk with a backflow on it, most of the backflows like that are tamper proof; trying to unscrew it and they rip up the threads.

If that is as old as you say the smart thing would be to replace with a anti-freeze hose bib with built in backflow protection.
 
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Old 07-14-10, 03:12 PM
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Thanks

Thanks everyone. I hadn't thought about those 'sheared' areas being landing spots for a wrench. We'll assume then that this is an add-on device.

The thing is, it definitely sprays the entire time the water is on. And looking at the shears, why wouldn't it? The hose connector gasket should've blocked the water from the sheared area? I did check that the hose connector had a gasket in it, but I suppose a gasket with a smaller hole could completely cover the sheared areas, preventing the spray.

Mom and I did discuss having them all replaced, as one poster suggests, so I believe that is the plan.

Thx
 
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Old 07-14-10, 03:17 PM
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Hose Bib Vacuum Breaker

They’re required by code at some locations AE258/AE113: Hose Connection Vacuum Breakers for Home Backflow Prevention, and supposed to be installed on all hose bibs (except clothes washers) that are connected to a potable water supply.

At end of article this article http://www.kennyhart.citymax.com/f/Hose_Bibs2.pdf, it shows how to remove one. Basically, he’s just making a slot in break-off screw so he can remove/loosen it w/ a slotted screwdriver . . . the device should then screw off w/o damaging faucet threads . . . I used a Dremel rotary tool to make the notch, and mine came off easily. If break-off screw won’t budge, you can cut the VB off by cutting right up to hose threads, and knocking off w/ a chisel.
 
 

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