Black specs in water


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Old 08-10-10, 01:09 PM
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Black specs in water

I am getting black specs in my hot and cold water in the kitchen and bathroom.

The water company tested the water outside and it was clear.

They are building several houses on my block one right next door to me. ( I don't know if that means anything). My neighbor across the street is not having water problems.

can we get sick from using this water?
How can I fix this? What is going on? please help
 
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Old 08-10-10, 02:49 PM
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Welcome to the forums!! Yes adjacent building can have an affect on your water if you are on the same municipal water supply. I doubt you could get sick from the water, but it is unsavory at best. I would suggest installing a whole house water filter with a 5 micron filter in it. You would be surprised how much little crap it takes out of the water. It is not difficult. Can you readily access where the water comes into your house. Is there a cut off valve there? Do you have a full basement or a crawlspace?
 
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Old 08-10-10, 09:13 PM
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My husband said that the water is coming into the house through the garage and the pipes are in the sheet rock. There is a shut off valve in the garage that he can get to.

We are wondering is there a way to filter just the water that we use inside the house because we have 2 taps outside for the hose and would rather not filter that water if we did not have to. (conserving water filters)

Thank you so much for all your help!
 
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Old 08-11-10, 04:20 AM
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It would be difficult to segregate your watering needs without repiping, so don't let that bother you too much. Without using point of use filters, the whole house filter is the best solution, and cheaper (less filters to change). Is the garage heated? Where are you located. I only ask because freezing becomes a problem in unheated garages, but it would be an ideal area to put the filters if that problem were alleviated.
 
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Old 08-11-10, 06:13 AM
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Our garage is not heated. Although I wish it had air conditioning!!!


We are in houston texas, freezing is not a huge problem here but it has occurred once or twice in my 5 years of living here.

I do have one more question. Keep in mind I have not clue how the plumbing works, Does it make sence that the water company did not find a problem when they came out to look at the water coming into the house? Or maybe they did not test the water specifically between my house and the house being built? I am just trying to understand how he can miss the specs. Not that is is very important, just on my mind.

Thank you again!
 
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Old 08-12-10, 12:24 AM
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If the black specs feel greasy, they're likely coming from a flexible supply (connector) that's deteriorating. I've seen this a few times with old braided flexible supplies at the water heater.

Many water districts have switched from using Chlorine to Chloramine - it's cheaper but will attack older rubber parts.
 
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Old 08-12-10, 05:50 AM
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I am getting black specs in my hot and cold water in the kitchen and bathroom
By seeing black specs in both hot and cold water, that makes me think of an issue with your main line supply . . . perhaps temporarily caused by new home construction nearby if they were tapping into water company’s distribution supply line.

By seeing black specs in just the kitchen and bathroom, that makes me wonder why this condition is not showing up in other water using areas of your home if one assumes a main line supply issue . . . perhaps closer inspection of other water faucets or washer might reveal this symptom applies across the entire house, and would help determine best course of action.

We are wondering is there a way to filter just the water that we use inside the house because we have 2 taps outside for the hose and would rather not filter that water if we did not have to. (conserving water filters)
With respect to conserving water filters . . . many whole house sediment filters use a replaceable paper filter cartridge. However, if not wanting to throw away replaceable filters, others are made of stainless steel mesh in a variety of different micron ratings.

Another option is to consider a kitchen under sink reverse osmosis system which addresses water usually ingested by people. Depending upon the quality of such installed system as well as filters selected for use, it can further minimize chemicals, bacteria, and other pollutants not observable to the eye . . . it still may require that a sediment filter be installed. If concerned about the quality of your drinking water, I would suggest doing a search “safety of drinking water from municipal systems”. Setting aside controversies associated with chemicals used to treat municipal water supplies, I’m reasonably comfortable with quality of water at the water plant where EPA water testing is required . . . less comfortable after water leaves the plant and runs through distribution lines to arrive at a person’s home. Many of the U.S. distributions systems are antiquated and need of replacement or repair but many municipalities don’t have the financial resources to make the investment in these infrastructure improvements.

During 2007, a major public concern erupted after people drinking water at their homes, who were connected to the W. Palm Beach, FL municipal water system, were becoming ill and having to be hospitalized. After issuing boil water safety alerts to customers and pointing a finger at a business allegedly installing an illegal tap to the distribution system, it was discovered by independent evaluators that the cause was bad municipal piping and insufficient maintenance of their system. This article summarizes major improvements proposed to be made assuming approvals and feasibility of financing the project West Palm plans $63 million filter system to improve drinking water. This is not an issue isolated to one local but similar conditions exist across the country. I reside closer to a town who has its own municipal system, and wouldn’t hesitate to drink their water w/o installing any in-home equipment as the plant uses best in class technology at its plant, and the distribution system is not antiquated. The point is that sweeping generalizations about safety of your drinking water has to be evaluated in the context of your particular municipal system . . . they are not all alike.
 
 

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