Frozen water in PVC pipe a concern?


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Old 08-27-10, 09:29 AM
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Frozen water in PVC pipe a concern?

Please move if in the wrong forum...

I need to extend the gutter downspout away from my house. My issue is the yard slopes towards the house so the drain opening will be higher than the downspout. In addition, I have to bury the PVC pipe a good 18 inches to go under my walkway. Due to physics, the entire underground pipe is going to be constantly filled with un-drainable water.

In the winter can this standing water crack the pipe when frozen? Is there a way to prevent this?

Is there another proper setup that I might consider?
 
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Old 08-27-10, 03:23 PM
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If the pipe is only partially filled with water it might not be damaged by the water freezing but if it is fully filled it most certainly will. You need to adjust the piping so that there is a continuous downward slope to ensure no water left in the pipe to be absolutely certain it will not be damaged by freezing.
 
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Old 08-27-10, 03:44 PM
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I haven't seen your house but ground sloping toward the house is generally a bad idea

Can you regrade to change the slope away from the house?
 
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Old 08-30-10, 03:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Luana View Post
If the pipe is only partially filled with water it might not be damaged by the water freezing but if it is fully filled it most certainly will. You need to adjust the piping so that there is a continuous downward slope to ensure no water left in the pipe to be absolutely certain it will not be damaged by freezing.
I really have no other option. The constant downward slope against the pipe will put the pipe 1 foot below grade. I'm assuming my only option is to bury a pipe underground and have it resurface x feet away from the house...again, allowing undrainable water in the pipe at all times.

Originally Posted by mitch17 View Post
I haven't seen your house but ground sloping toward the house is generally a bad idea

Can you regrade to change the slope away from the house?
Unfortunately, this is how the home was built. It's a pretty drastic slope from the street to the home. My entire yard slopes.
 
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Old 08-31-10, 08:49 PM
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An improperly pitched drain will constantly give you problems with clogs. Freezing will likely cause a problem within a couple years if not sooner.

Have you considered draining it into a drywell? Basically a hole filled with gravel for the water to drain into, then seep into the soil slowly. You'll have to dig pretty deeply so the 'top' of the drywell is at the 18" mark, then dig down from there.

Can you go the other direction around the house so you do have some downward pitch?
 
 

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