Can this be turned into a drain?


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Old 12-01-10, 09:11 PM
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Can this be turned into a drain?

This has bugged me for a long time - the water heater and furnace is in a furnace closet that doesn't have a drain. While opening up the wall to fix up the room to install a new water heater, I noticed what appears to be a cleanout and the vent pipe for the shower basin in the bathroom right next to this closet. Can I somehow tap into this cleanout or vent pipe to create a drain here? Then I could run the pressure relief valve and condensate lines into the drain. Right the pressure relief valve goes nowhere other than the concrete floor and I have a condensate pump.

 
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Old 12-01-10, 09:26 PM
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1. It depends on the codes in your area.
2. You will most likely need to put a trap there if code implys.
3. you would want a backflow valve there if your sewer ever backs up you will have waste in your basement without this item.

Mike
 
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Old 12-01-10, 09:31 PM
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Would you recommend cutting the vent pipe and putting a T above there and a trap, or rather extending that angled cleanout somehow, and a trap?
 
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Old 12-02-10, 10:42 AM
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I would not cut. I would unscrew the clean out and screw in a 3 or 4 inch male adapter.( what ever size that is) Then get a 22 degree street elbow and that will bring you to level. Then backflow valve, trap, then riser.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 12-02-10, 03:52 PM
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[QUOTE=flyingpolarbear;1795575]This has bugged me for a long time - the water heater and furnace is in a furnace closet that doesn't have a drain. While opening up the wall to fix up the room to install a new water heater, I noticed what appears to be a cleanout and the vent pipe for the shower basin in the bathroom right next to this closet.I somehow tap into this cleanout or vent pipe to create a drain here? Can Then I could run the pressure relief valve and condensate lines into the drain. Right the pressure relief valve goes nowhere other than the concrete floor and I have a condensate pump.

>>>somehow tap into this cleanout or vent pipe to create a drain here?>>Then I could run the pressure relief valve and condensate lines into the drain.
 
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Old 12-02-10, 04:08 PM
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Yes sorry a 45 not a 22. 45 plus 45 equals 90 .
 
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Old 12-03-10, 01:26 AM
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Thanks for all the tips, it sounds like I have some possibilities for the drain. Now, the only thing I'm not sure about is if I have to do anything with the pressure relief valve or just leave it as-is without a pipe connected to it (since this furnace closet is inside the house). A friend suggested attaching a pipe to the pressure relief valve and leaving it exposed 6 inches from the ground (which would flood the closet I suppose, if it was to start spraying).
 
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Old 12-03-10, 10:02 AM
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You could pipe the relief valve into your new drain. Just make sure you pitch slightly from relief valve to drain. Run to drain like below and you can stick it in the pipe alittle. Or put a bell coupling on top.

Correct:

http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0WTb_u0If...tuff/tpr-2.jpg

Wrong and I have seen this many times:

http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0WTb_1DIv...ed-uphill1.jpg

Mike NJ
 
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Old 12-03-10, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by flyingpolarbear View Post
Thanks for all the tips, it sounds like I have some possibilities for the drain. Now, the only thing I'm not sure about is if I have to do anything with the pressure relief valve or just leave it as-is without a pipe connected to it (since this furnace closet is inside the house). A friend suggested attaching a pipe to the pressure relief valve and leaving it exposed 6 inches from the ground (which would flood the closet I suppose, if it was to start spraying).
You can run it to a drain thru a air gap, the idea is to be able to see there's a problem if it goes off, you CAN'T run it into a fixture due to the chance of someone being burned
 
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Old 12-03-10, 02:24 PM
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Originally Posted by shacko View Post
You can run it to a drain thru a air gap, the idea is to be able to see there's a problem if it goes off, you CAN'T run it into a fixture due to the chance of someone being burned
Is there a fitting that is typically used to create such an air gap? I am picturing something like a pipe coming from above with a few inches gap and a funnel on the bottom that would catch the hot steam and water. I don't know if such a thing exists or if this is common to build something like that.
 
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Old 12-03-10, 03:14 PM
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This is what we use. After you trap put this on your riser. Of course the pic is upside down. This allows enough space to look in to see if anything is dripping. Thats an air gap. The pipe should go into the larger end below the lip. The inspector can then see the end of the pipe. If your doing 2" then a 2"x3" is good.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 12-05-10, 03:11 AM
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For it to meet International code you will need to have a air gap and a trap primer
 
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Old 12-05-10, 04:10 AM
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Originally Posted by 2ndprimetime View Post
For it to meet International code you will need to have a air gap and a trap primer
A trap primer makes sense when a drain could go dry and emit sewer gases. But that makes me curious - how would one determine whether a drain is the type that could dry up? After all, our bathroom sink outside by the pool is rarely used in the winter and the trap in that sink probably dries up in the winter.

While searching the web on trap primers, I found a product called Trap Guard that uses a rubber flap. It seems simple and I wonder if that thing actually works long-term.
 
 

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