broken pipe(from freezing) in empty home purchase


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Old 12-12-10, 06:42 AM
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broken pipe(from freezing) in empty home purchase

this is my first post on this forum and i am sure there will be many more!

I am buying a HUD home. it has been sitting empy since april. after the inspection in september the house was not properly winterized-apparently it is my fault. the heat and water were turned on this week for an appraisal and a pipe on the second floor in the wall beneath the bathroom started leaking heavily. the water poured out on the second floor through a lighting fixture and through the first floor into the basement. the main water line was turned off a few minutes after this. the lines were drained and antifreeze was added to the toilets, bath, etc.

i have no experience with plumbing and this will be my first house. if i still decide to close next week.

with freezing pipes in an empty house what else can be expected? will it typically break in one place or many?

i am trying to decide if this is a deal breaker for buying the home.
 
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Old 12-12-10, 08:59 AM
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broken pipe(from freezing) in empty home purchase

I used to have a summer cottage that had no heat, so I am familiar with your problem. Once you turn the heat on if you only have one leak then that is all there is. There is a clamp type repair that is effective and cheap that can be used for copper pipes anyway. I am not sure about galvanized but I suspect that the clamp will work as well. Of course you will need to expose the pipe and have room around it to fit the clamp. (You will need at least 1/2 inch behind and 4 to 6 inches of room for the clamp. Older houses that had no heat often had water piping designed to drain. All the plumbing would drain from a specific low spot. Otherwise you will need to drain all low areas before shutting off the heat. As far as a deal breaker, that is up to you. Once repaired, it shouldn't happen again unless you turn the heat off without draining the pipes.
 
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Old 12-12-10, 10:43 AM
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Unless you can zero in on the amount of damage, it could be a deal breaker. How many pipes are broken? How much damage did the water cause to the sheetrock, cabinets, etc.?
I don't see where it was your fault, since you don't own the property, yet. It would be the responsibility of the owner (Government, Bank, other) to provide you with a house that you can live in. You will not be able to occupy this house for a while since the repairs need to be effected, and if it is between floors, the sheetrock has to come down. I would have the "deal" include proper repairs to the structure and plumbing by the current owner.
 
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Old 12-12-10, 10:13 PM
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Thank you for the responses. My bigest concern is that there is more than one break. Hopefully when i bring a plumber over this week to do an estimate they can tell me if there are any other problems. anyone know a good plumbing company in cincinnati-i was just going to call roto rooter.

i think all of the pipes in the house are copper. that clamp sounds like an interesting fix once i get in there and see what has happened. i wish i new where to cut the dry wall to find the pipe. is there a good way to find out?

how many lines go to a bathroom? i am guessing there are 4. hot and cold send and return. is that correct? i will read more in the forms and on the net about it.

i will try to post up pics and continue this thread when i have more info.
 
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Old 12-13-10, 07:43 AM
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I would be concerned with more than one break, or expansion of the copper and weakening of the walls of the line. In a bathroom you have two lines, hot and cold....no return. It may split one to the sink(s), one to the tub, and a single cold to the toilet. Kitchen would probably only have one to the sink. Your refrigerator ice maker may have a cold tap somewhere, but it could be at the sink, or under the floor if exposed.
Let's have the pix, and we'll help all we can.
 
 

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