Trust JACO Just-for-Copper instead of soldering??/


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Old 12-16-10, 03:58 PM
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Trust JACO Just-for-Copper instead of soldering??/

Was gonna buy a new torch/solder/flux for sweating some copper, instead hardware salesman sold me JACO "Just-For-Copper" for this very small job (a 2nd bathroom sink) - Everything held but when I tried to tighten a dripping shutoff valve a joint "gave" and it started "bubbling". I replaced the bad section and it's holding.

I'm now dis-trustful of the JACO "Just-For-Copper" - If it won't hold a joint sufficiently to tighten a shutoff, then should it be trusted???


Is Just-For-Copper to be trusted?
 
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Old 12-16-10, 04:34 PM
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Not enough info to make a judgement and never used it but I did go to the web site. If there are testamonials for a product I am always leary and they have a whole page of them.

I would not use this product.

Teflon tape, Teflon paste, pipe dope ect. Been using 20 plus years no issues. Tried and true for threaded applications.

Mike Nj
 
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Old 12-16-10, 05:02 PM
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An interesting technology. Their site says it is not approved by plumbing codes and a variance is required. If you're job is permitted the inspector might ask "where's the solder".

However, the concept of using a cold bonding agent rather than a heated solder joint might have a future. That's assuming that copper pipe survives the PEX incursion.
 
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Old 12-17-10, 07:06 AM
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I agree, it's interesting... but I wouldn't want to be one of the early adopters of this technology. There are a lot of products out there that "fix leaks easily", but I've found most of them work well only in very specific situations.

In my opinion, if you don't want to solder, I'd either go for compression fittings or SharkBite fittings. Though there is some disagreement of the potential longevity of SharkBites, I think you'd be much better off than something like this.

Just my opinion...
 
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Old 12-17-10, 07:38 AM
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Thanks for all the replies and comments.

I'd still like to hear from someone who has actually used this product "longterm."
 
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Old 12-17-10, 09:16 AM
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as info... I took my removed "bad" section of pipe to test the remaining good joint. The treaded adapter (for the shutoff) joint had not leaked. The "next" joint (on the elbow) is the one that failed.

To see how strong the good joint was....
I put a vise grip on the threaded adapter and a vise grip tight on the pipe itself (which flattened the pipe of course.) I twisted as hard as I could and I could not get the joint to fail!

Why the elbow joint failed when I tightened the shutoff, I don't know....
 
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Old 12-17-10, 01:55 PM
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Originally Posted by 1611mac View Post
Thanks for all the replies and comments.

I'd still like to hear from someone who has actually used this product "longterm."
I don't think that you will find someone that used it "longterm" it hasn't been around long enough.
I would be more interested in areas that have approved it
 
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Old 12-17-10, 03:15 PM
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Exclamation What is interesting to me is that people would consider using this product!

All the advertising hype does not change the fact that this is just glue.

I personally would not be able to sleep nights if I had charged someone for a job and used this stuff.
Even with a waiver I am sure my insurance company would not pay a dime if an unapproved product failed and flooded someone's home or business.

So I wonder why exactly this is not approved...............maybe a solder mfr conspiracy.
 
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Old 12-18-10, 07:28 AM
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"Just glue" depends on the glue. There are some epoxy glues that are very strong and reliable.

I don't know how long this stuff has been around. If it's fairly new that may explain the lack of code aceptance. I do believe that acceptance of this product would certainly be opposed by most trrade groups.

Just a few years ago there were similar discussions about push on "O" ring fittings. Now their use is widespread and if it weren't for cost they would probably replace soldered fittings completely.
 
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Old 12-23-10, 06:48 PM
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I'd like to point out that while it may take a little practice to get a good soldering technique, soldering is not that difficult, nor time-consuming, nor expensive. It does produce a very reliable joint. You can solder a joint and after 30 years of expansion & contraction and whatever else it may endure, it will still be holding.

I did an experiment with the copper glue stuff once. I took two copper plates, applied a generous amount of copper glue and clamped them overnight. The following morning I was able to separate them by hand.

There's more to re-piping that just joining pipe. If that stumps you, you really should consider getting professional help. Copper glue is a poor attempt at a workaround for something that doesn't need a workaround, IMHO.
 
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Old 12-25-10, 07:39 PM
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Again, I am not a shill for this product and I have no problem soldering pipe. But, not having a closed mind, I'm willing to wait and see if this stuff has a future here. Apparently it has been approved and is in use in other countries (Australia and Britain were two listed). But, I would not be first in line to replumb my house with this but I think the concept has merit.

The main ingredient of this glue is polyglycol dimethcrylate. I'm not a chemist so I don't know what the heck that is, but I know it is also the primary chemical used in Loktite. Similar to Loktite it is quick setting. The manufacturer touts a set time to strength of under 10 seconds and to pressure in 7 minutes.

According to the manufacturer, the bonding agent has been tested to ASTM D4541. Assuming the test data provided is honest the adhesion failure was at almost 1400 PSI and torque adhesion failure at over 300 PSI for 1/2" copper pipe.

Again, according to the manufacturer, failures were mostly related to precleaning the fittings.

big drawback - not code, approved but more significant, not potable water approved in the US.
 
 

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