Basement Shower Drain


  #1  
Old 03-20-11, 06:43 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 7
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Basement Shower Drain

I would like to install a shower stall in the basement. There is a 1 1/2" ptrap in a pit below cement floor. This ptrap was originally installed for a tub with the drain above the ptrap. I would install the shower in the same area but the shower drain is about 2 feet from the ptrap. I would have to build a platform for the shower to raise the base up enough for an elbow. The question I have is will there be sewer smell with 2 foot pipe if ptrap is not directly under shower drain; and will this installation cause any draining problems?
 
  #2  
Old 03-20-11, 07:09 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 38,985
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
Sad news is you can't use a 1 1/2" drain on a shower. It must be 2" with a trap as well.
 
  #3  
Old 03-20-11, 08:35 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 166
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
What I've done in this situation is jackhammer a little trench over to the shower drain and set a 2" p-trap. There is a good chance that the current 1 1/2" trap drains into a 2" pipe close to the trap. Dig aroung a little bit.
 
  #4  
Old 03-21-11, 01:22 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 7
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Why 1 1/2 tub and 2 shower? Some of this code crap blows my mind !!
 
  #5  
Old 03-21-11, 03:06 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 38,985
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
I'll agree with you. Makes no sense to have 50 gallons of water go through a 1 1/2" line at one time, while a shower would put 3 gallons per minute max through a 2" line. Go figure. BUT they don't make a 1 1/2" shower drain, so it' catch 22.
 
  #6  
Old 03-21-11, 03:15 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,502
Received 78 Upvotes on 70 Posts
Because a shower does not have a high lip like a tub. You need to remove the water from the base faster then a tub, so you dont overflow. Plus a tub have a overflow a shower does not.

Does it sound logical?

Mike NJ
 
  #7  
Old 03-22-11, 06:33 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 38,985
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
Logical would be to make all tub and shower drains 2", but that would require retooling an entire industry.
 
  #8  
Old 03-22-11, 07:31 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 17,790
Received 37 Upvotes on 29 Posts
Well, Chandler, there may come a time when you get your wish and all drains will be a minimum of 2-inch pipe. In the meantime I guess you'll just have to wait another few minutes for the tub to completely drain.

How often have you heard/read of someone still using a bathtub that takes an hour to drain after a bath? You sure wouldn't be doing that with a shower! The 2-inch minimum for a shower DOES make sense.
 
  #9  
Old 03-26-11, 06:22 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 38,985
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
Oh, I agree. It would just make my job of remodeling much easier to go and remove a tub, slightly relocate the drain and put in a shower without having to remove the floor to run a new 2" line to the main. I've got two lined up this month and have to tell the client why it costs what it does. They think a drain is a drain.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: