Main Gas Valve Shut off


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Old 05-11-11, 02:00 PM
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Main Gas Valve Shut off

The last owner of our house left a capped metal gas pipe sticking straight out from the wall in the laundry area which is causing an obstruction to a walk way. The plan is to remove the pipe which protrudes about 6 inches and use a plug with the proper compound sealant. There is no shut off valve at the line so I am planning to cut gas flow from the main shut off valve - was planning on just turning on the outside gas bbq after shutting off to remove any pressure in the line.

My question is whether there are other consideration to shutting off the main gas valve of the house. I read on the PG&E website that you should only use the shutoff in an emergency and once shut off there may be a delay in returning gas service when turned back on. Don't know what that means or how PG&E would even know about the temporary shut off. It's a relatively easy DIY project but I don't want to miss anything since I'll be dealing with gas.

Any thoughts would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 05-11-11, 02:27 PM
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I read on the PG&E website that you should only use the shutoff in an emergency and once shut off there may be a delay in returning gas service when turned back on.
Could you post a link to that statement above????

You should be ok. If the pipe is coming out of the wall, make sure you hold back on the pipe when removing the cap. This way it does not turn in the wall. The last thing you want is a leak in the wall.

Although after you remove the cap you may want to snug the pipe some. If its coming out of the wall, and the otherside is underground, I would use caution. Could be corroded.

I see alot of guys do it on the fly without turning the gas off. Its only 1/2 psi or so. This is not recommended, because you never know what could happen. I always turn the gas off. make sure you relite, and run all appliances for a few minutes after.

Get a spray bottle with a soapy solution .and check for leaks. If you have any old style packing style gas valves at the appliances, now is a good time to change them. Also any gray aluminum flex hoses to the appliances. They leak and are not to code anymore.

Good luck..

Mike NJ
 
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Old 05-11-11, 03:31 PM
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Turning Your Gas Off

Under the subsection "when to turn your gas off."

Thanks for the reply. I hadn't considered where the pipe is coming from and will do a little demo to make sure. I am hoping I see am elbow in the wall since it is literally sticking out at 90 degrees and its not coming from the outside. I was going to remove the entire pipe at the elbow and plug the elbow. Figured if we ever sold our place I would just disclose to the new owner that the pipe is in the wall in case they want to do some demolition or remodeling.

I thought about the appliances and the only one I could think that would be impacted is the water heater, the stove has the electric ignition.
 
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Old 05-11-11, 03:34 PM
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Dont close a fitting in the wall. I believe it needs to be exposed. I will check the code.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 05-11-11, 04:22 PM
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Thanks Mike. I spoke with PG&E and they did not seem to have a problem with it and said they would even come out after and check to see that it was not leaking. They specifically said that they didn't know the code though. I tried to several times to get an answer from my department of building inspection but wasn't able to get anyone who could provide more information than that I had to come in and get a permit "for pretty much everything." Any input is appreciated.
 
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Old 05-11-11, 10:12 PM
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Common sense dictates not leaving a capped gas line in a wall. It would be like leaving live electrical wires in a wall cavity.
 
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Old 05-12-11, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by VIPlumber View Post
Common sense dictates not leaving a capped gas line in a wall. It would be like leaving live electrical wires in a wall cavity.
Any authority? I really am trying to learn as I go. The closest code I could find was the California Building code 1211.3.2 which says it is okay to use gas pipe fittings in concealed systems so long as those fittings/connections were not used in direct combination. I know capping a line is a different situation and would like to know what codes are controlling in this situation if any.
 

Last edited by FTHO12; 05-12-11 at 11:36 AM.
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Old 05-12-11, 11:18 AM
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I'm not a professional, but I see (and have seen) no issue with enclosed pipes or capped pipes. As long as you're using an approved cap (black pipe cap and not some flexible something or other), it would be the same as having an elbow or coupler in the wall.
 
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Old 05-12-11, 02:16 PM
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Im looking....

In all my plumbing career, we were never alowed to teminate a fitting and conceal it in a wall. It may seem the same as a regular fitting, but its not a joint. I am looking for the code.

It may be part of the building code, and not specifically plumbing.

Is it similar to electrical, and juction boxes? I dont know.

It would seem all joints need to be visable. If I ran out of couplings would I be able to put 5 tees in the walls with caps? I would think not.




Mike NJ
 
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Old 05-12-11, 02:55 PM
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From the international fuel gas code...


404.3 Piping in concealed locations. Portions of a piping system installed in concealed locations shall not have unions, tubing fittings, right and left couplings, bushings, compression couplings and swing joints made by combinations of fittings.

Exceptions:


1. Tubing joined by brazing.
2. Fittings listed for use in concealed locations.

I will look in the building code, but I think thats good enough.

" I just feel its wrong "

Mike NJ
 
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Old 05-12-11, 05:16 PM
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Mike - It sounds like the California Code takes its language directly from 404.3 except it lists the fittings, "fittings shall be of the following type: 1)Pipe fittings such as elbows, tees, and couplings."

Is the concern that a concealed cap would be dangerous because it could potentially leak gas in the wall or that an unknowing future owner could later damage it with construction, or another condition altogether?

I was thinking I could leave the cap exposed but the elbow would still be sealed in the wall. I also thought maybe I could just plug the elbow in the wall and rather than patching the wall, cover the hole with a removable plate of some sort that would leave access to the fitting and hopefully would signal future would be demo guys to take a peak before running the sawzall.

I appreciate your comments. It's nice to be able to get the opinion of Pros with experience.
 
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Old 05-12-11, 07:44 PM
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I like the idea of leaving an access hole. You could use a two-gang low voltage frame and then add a blank plate. As long as you don't use any of the prohibited fittings or leave a valve in the void space you should be okay.
 
 

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