need to move a sink supply line valve


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Old 05-17-11, 08:35 AM
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need to move a sink supply line valve

Hello all. I'm finishing a bathroom remodel project and just installed a cabinet style, free standing vanity. I need to be able to move the vanity a few inches to the left in order to center it on the bathroom wall. One of the supply lines prevents this because of the location of the vanity drawers.

Long story short I need to move one of the supply valves 6 inches to the left. I was thinking is it possible to chop the copper pipe, put a compression elbow on it and run a flex pipe from that, to an in-line shutoff valve, then another flex pipe from that to the faucet. Is that possible, not possible, or just plain wrong way of doing this? I was just looking for the easiest non-solder way of doing this. I can sweat pipe, but it's right against the wall and I don't want to mess with fire around the drywall and I prefer not to remove any drywall. The current drywall holes are big enough that I could easily cut the pipe and apply a fitting.

THANKS!
 
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Old 05-17-11, 03:54 PM
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A real easy way is to exchange that vanity, for one that has the drawers on the other side. If you don't want to do that, use a shark bite elbow to make the turn in the pipe. It snaps on like Leggos.
 
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Old 05-17-11, 07:02 PM
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thanks! yeah can't return the vanity, I've cut the back side of it to fit the waste pipe. This is is horribly designed, but looks really nice.

but yeah i was just looking at the shark bite stuff right before I came to check this thread. so ill do the shark bite elbow, to a pvc pipe, to a pvc inline valve, to another pvc, to a shark bite/male MIP end, then connect the flex faucet supply line to that. Sound like an ok idea or is it over complicating it somehow? Also, when I turn off the house water, drain the line, and remove the existing valve, the copper will likely be threaded right? Was thinking I would just cut it off below the threads and then attach the shark bite fitting. Thanks for helping. I'm very handy for the most part, but not experienced in plumbing outside of cementing PVC pipes together.
 
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Old 05-17-11, 08:03 PM
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Don't use a PVC valve, when you most need it is when it will fail. I would use the least amount of PVC and the least number of shark-bites possible. As long as you know how to solder copper solder up what you need on the bench and use the shark-bite only at the wall.

It is extremely unlikely that you have any threaded copper in your home. More likely as not is that the existing valve has a "compression" fitting on the inlet side. These use a brass ring, called a ferrule, that crimps onto the copper tubing (pipe) when the nut on the valve is tightened. If you are not familiar with this method (it is very common) then check out a couple of books on DIY plumbing at your local library or thumb through them at the megamart homecenter.
 
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Old 05-18-11, 03:58 PM
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cool thanks everyone! I think I'll use a shark bite elbow and do as Furd suggested and sweat the inline ball valve onto two copper pipes while at the bench and then attach to the shark bite elbow.

Furd, have you seen it where the shark bite adapters fail and is that why you recommend as few as possible? Cause shark bite also makes an inline ball valve and that would just be REALLY easy
 
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Old 05-18-11, 04:15 PM
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Quite honestly, I have never used a shark-bite nor have I ever seen one in use. I HAVE used similar fittings in pneumatic systems where they worked just fine.

Of course with pneumatic if you have a leak you don't have the mess that you would with water. The primary reason to minimize the shark-bites is their cost, something like $4 a fitting as I recall in 1/2 inch sizes.

If it were me I would just break out some drywall, solder the whole thing and then patch the drywall. I detest drywall work but in the end it isn't really that bad.
 
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Old 05-18-11, 09:29 PM
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One shark bite is not a big deal. I wouldn't use 27 of them, as someone said they saw in a crawl space. So far, I haven't had any complaints about them leaking.
 
 

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