Pressure testing gas pipe with gas valves closed but still attached

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-21-11, 11:47 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 1
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Pressure testing gas pipe with gas valves closed but still attached

What is the pressure rating on most gas valves? I want to pressure test my new installation, but feel removing all the gas valves and capping all the pipes is not only a hassle, but increases the likelihood of creating an actual leak. I literally unscrewed one pipe and re-attached it into a t-fitting. I was thinking of doing a lower pressure test 10PSI (vs 15), and just leave it for longer. What are the chances I will break one of my valves at 10psi? Can I just close all of them and safely pump up to 10 psi?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-22-11, 11:43 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: usa
Posts: 90
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by poppew View Post
What is the pressure rating on most gas valves? I want to pressure test my new installation, but feel removing all the gas valves and capping all the pipes is not only a hassle, but increases the likelihood of creating an actual leak. I literally unscrewed one pipe and re-attached it into a t-fitting. I was thinking of doing a lower pressure test 10PSI (vs 15), and just leave it for longer. What are the chances I will break one of my valves at 10psi? Can I just close all of them and safely pump up to 10 psi?
You close the gas shut off cocks, but if you are talking about the gas electric value. they are only made for about 1/2 lb pressure. 10 lbs would blow the insides
up. paul
 
  #3  
Old 05-22-11, 03:28 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 166
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You can apply much much more pressure than 15psi to a gas ****/valve if that's what your asking. It shouldn't be a problem as long as you shut off ALL the valves to the appliances. Furnace, water heater, fireplace, range, etc... Your pressure test can only be applied to the gas pipe not the fixures.
 
  #4  
Old 05-22-11, 04:16 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,799
Received 10 Votes on 8 Posts
If the gas valve is a newer ball style I believe you pump up half of what the gauge says. We always used 30 or 50 psi gauges. This is what the inspectors wanted. If 50 psi gauge, we needed 25 psi in there. It had to hold for 8 hours? I am thinking 4 hours though if I remember right. I know its in the code somewhere.

What you do not want to pressure test, is the old grease packing gas valves. You will blow them out as someone descibed below. You would blow them out.

Mike NJ
 
  #5  
Old 02-10-14, 09:45 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 365
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Old thread, but on topic of my concern.

I had a pressure test done this weekend and one of the valves was an old grease packed one as described. It leaked badly during the test. The plumber tightened the nut and it stopped the leakage.

I realize that these are not code, but does this mean my old gas valve is now damaged because of the test and will fail? Do I have an issue on my hands because it is back in service/
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: