Outside hose spigot (hose bib / sil ****) broekn .. how to fix


  #1  
Old 05-29-11, 11:34 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 55
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Question Outside hose spigot (hose bib / sil ****) broekn .. how to fix

While opening the outside faucet, the handle broke off. Here is a picture of the faucet. (I am seeing couple of terms, hose bib, sil co*k etc not sure what I have). The green handle is broken, Its not rotating the valve that turns water on or off. (and it has turned the valve on ..)



I have a shut off valve just inside the wall. here is a picture of that. I have shut that off.


Here is the basement wall which hides this shut off valve.

Whats the best way to fix it? If it needs to be replaced, I would like to use quarter turn ball valve hose bib (something like this, much easier to turn on or off). I am in MA ..


Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 05-29-11, 11:55 AM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 37 Upvotes on 29 Posts
There should be a screw in the center of the handle that holds it on the faucet stem but yours is missing. Pull the handle off (it may need some slight persuading) and see if the screw is actually missing or if it is broken off inside the stem.

The handle attaches to the faucet stem with a spline connection and is held in place by the screw. More likely as not the faucet stem spline is just fine but it is stripped out in the handle as the handle is as soft die-cast metal. If this is true then you can purchase a new handle and screw for a buck or two at any decent hardware store. Amazingly, a huge mega-mart homecenter may not have just the handle but will require you to purchase an entire faucet assembly.

As for replacing the entire faucet with the quarter-turn model...I cannot be certain but I think you have a threaded faucet with a threaded adapter soldered onto the copper piping from the inside shut-off valve and the outside faucet. Theoretically you could just unscrew it from the outside but as a practical matter if you tried this there would be a good chance of twisting (and breaking) the copper piping and it could be before or after that inside shut-off valve. If I were doing the job I would cut the copper downstream of the shut-off valve and then pull the faucet out, replace the outside faucet and re-install the assembly using a soldered coupling at the inside valve. You could also use a "shark bite" no-solder coupling at the inside valve.
 
  #3  
Old 05-29-11, 01:32 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 55
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I took out to screw since the handle didn't seem to turn the faucet stem. I will post a picture of the broken handle later.
How do I ensure that I have threaded adapter at the end of the copper pipe? Can I ask a helper to hold the inside copper pipe with a pipe wrench (channel lock) and turn the outside faucet with another pipe wrench? Will that ensure that inside water pipe does not break at the solder?
 
  #4  
Old 05-29-11, 02:09 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 18,190
Received 78 Upvotes on 70 Posts
Where the valve is inside the house, see if you could stick your arms in there toward the valve. You should be able to feel if its threaded. Thats if you can reach that far.



You are better off cutting that valve out and replace it with a F/F type. Vacumm breakers are often required.

Amazon.com: LDR 020 6410 10-Inch Frost Proof Sillcock, Chrome Plated: Home Improvement

Shut the inside valve off
Cut the pipe after the valve, and leave 2" or so of copper pipe.
Remove the old hose bib
Get a new hose bib, and solder a length of pipe the length of the old hose bib and pipe. ( if you understand this)
Then when you slip in the new hose bib it should but pipe to pipe where you cut inside the house.
Use a coupling, and solder.

Hope this helps


Mike NJ
 
  #5  
Old 05-29-11, 04:03 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 55
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
thanks Mike ..
I tried and I think I reached the end of the inside wall but did not feel the threads.

I think I do understand what you are saying .. But that is beyond my expertise/confidence. So I would need to hire someone to do it

It seems that just by changing the handle, it might be OK. So I am going to try that first.
 
  #6  
Old 05-29-11, 05:18 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 18,190
Received 78 Upvotes on 70 Posts
The handles I think are cast. They crack sometimes, and strip. If the stem still has splines, then the trick is finding the correct handle and screw.

Mike NJ
 
  #7  
Old 05-29-11, 05:55 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 37 Upvotes on 29 Posts
I have a similar faucet on the side of my house. Today I discovered it is dripping slowly so it is either take it apart and fix it or replace it. I like the idea of a quarter-turn valve but I don't know off hand if they have models with vacuum breakers, which are required by plumbing codes almost everywhere.

Anyway, I KNOW my valve is threaded with a copper thread adapter because I installed it only a few years ago. I can't see the threaded adapter (nor feel it) because the siding and sheathing is too thick where the pipe enters the wall. I can't use a frost-proof because it goes through the garage wall which is only 2X4 construction with no interior wall. Oh, I suppose I could use a frost-proof but it would look kind of funky inside. Downside is that I've never seen a frost-free that was also a quarter-turn faucet.
 
  #8  
Old 05-29-11, 06:29 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 18,190
Received 78 Upvotes on 70 Posts
Yes they have 1/4 turn FF. The problem with 1/4 turn FF is the majority of them are ceramic disk type cartridges. We all know what sediment does to these right? And please dont tell me your water has no sediment.

Are you talking ball valve hose bibs? Those are really boilerdrains I think. There is some code I think. really not sure. I feel any hose bib replacement should have a vacuum breaker.

I only use mansfield because rebuilds are easy. from 4"-14"

Also if you want to retrofit a old style with breaker or backflow . Page 18,19

Page 24 has just the breakers for old style. Alot of homeowners use them to me code during the sale of a home.


http://www.mansfieldplumbing.com/ima...sPriceList.pdf


Mike NJ
 
  #9  
Old 05-30-11, 12:11 AM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 37 Upvotes on 29 Posts
Thanks, Mike.

No, I don't want any ceramic disc valves and I won't insult you by (falsely) claiming my water has no sediment.

I've seen the ball valve sillcocks, the ones with a flange to butt up against the siding. How good they are is another question that I have no answer.

My faucet in the back is a frost-free and I have another that (someday) I plan on installing on the other side of the house. Gotta get the crawlspace cleaned out first 'cause it's just too nasty down there to crawl on my belly to the other side of the house.

I have (somewhere) one or two of those add-on vacuum breakers. A new disc for the existing valve and maybe a seat regrind along with the vacuum breaker may be the best answer.
 
  #10  
Old 05-30-11, 06:09 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
Mike, Furd, not to further hijack the post, but I think the information may be helpful. I have replaced a few of the FF faucets with the quarter turn ones (on the advice if a plumber friend). My biggest problem with the FF's was the washer on the end. They would not use the faucet for a year, then the washer would stick to the seat and pull off the screw head when they did finally operate it. Replacing the washer is no biggie....digging the stuck one out is. So the quarter turns sounded like a good alternative. Now you interject this very viable situation with sediment. Mostly well water up here, with a mix of city/county.
Most of the FF's I replace is due to leaving a hose hooked up, or, lately leaving a "Y" hooked up with the valves closed. Swore they did not leave the hose hooked up all winter. Well, duh! Nice split, always on top, and always only about an inch long. Pretty consistent.
Thanks for the information so far.
 
  #11  
Old 06-21-11, 12:58 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 55
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I finally got the handle from home depot and found out that the square hole in the handle does not fit the stem that I have. Here is how the existing stem looks

The distance between curved edges is 3/8 while the distance between straight edges is 5/16
I used a file to make the hole on homedepot handle (mueller) match that of the stem. This worked, to an extent. now the handle is fitted on the stem, but the handle can only rotate the stem some distance. The old handle had a protruding circle that could go inside as the handle turned. The homedepot handle is flat and can not go inside as the stem retreats.
Local small hardware shops dont seem to have a replacement handle .. the website of prier does not list any handle that seems to match this description .. Can you guys help me find a replacement handle on the interwebs?

Thanks
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: