exterior faucet squeak


  #1  
Old 06-04-11, 05:55 PM
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exterior faucet squeak

My exterior faucet squeaks when turned on and off; I've been instructed to just grease the spline or washer on the (inside) end of the shaft. I removed the handle, then the nut, but now I'm stuck- can't figure out how to remove the shaft. It seems to be held in place, but I don't know if it's a washer or what holding it there and I don't want to muscle it & destroy it or muck it up. Any suggestions for a next step?
* I didn't think that it was necessary to remove the entire faucet off of the siding-would that help?

Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 06-04-11, 06:06 PM
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You need to FIRST turn off the water to this faucet, it may have a separate valve inside or you may need to turn off the entire house supply.

After removing the handle you need to remove the big nut that surrounds the stem, this will allow you to remove the stem from the valve but it isn't necessary. Add a little plumber's grease in the big nut where the stem normally goes and reassemble. Turn the water back on.
 
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Old 06-05-11, 10:48 AM
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thanks furd; I had already turned off the water before starting anything; I did remove the big nut and the stem is still secure within the faucet housing- there's a kind of off-white packing or washer or something recessed within the faucet housing and it's secure around the stem. The stem still doesn't budge (turns on/off but I can't remove the stem), even after removing that big nut. If I turn the stem at this stage though, it still squeaks as if It was fully assembled. So it apparently needs lubrication..I just can't figure how to get the lube to the area that needs it.
 
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Old 06-05-11, 01:27 PM
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The off-white piece is a Teflon packing block and that shouldn't need any lubrication. Normally the stem would just unscrew from the body of the valve and push the Teflon out with it although it may take a bit more effort in turning.

HOWEVER, if you see another hexagon shape below the packing nut and it looks like there is a joint with the valve body you may have a "screwed bonnet" valve and if so then using a wrench on that hex will take the stem/bonnet assembly out of the valve body. Be sure that the stem is turned to about half-way between open and closed when removing or replacing the stem/bonnet assembly or you will damage the stem assembly. Once you get it apart you can grease the threads where the stem (not bonnet) screws into the body.

Or, what I would do is simply get used to the squeak, it doesn't really hurt anything.
 
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Old 06-11-11, 11:09 AM
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Thanks Furd but I'm just a simple weekend diy-er, and so I'm not real clear on your language. You lost me here,
"HOWEVER, if you see another hexagon shape below the packing nut and it looks like there is a joint with the valve body you may have a "screwed bonnet" valve and if so then using a wrench on that hex will take the stem/bonnet assembly out of the valve body."
-there is only one hexagon nut and I removed it then I saw the Teflon packing block, which wouldn't budge. And since there's only one nut to remove, I can't follow the rest of your advice. So I'm still confused on what to do next. I can't get to the part that I need to lube, and have no idea how to remove the Teflon packing block without damaging/ destroying it. I can put some vice grips/pliers on the threaded part that the faucet handle mounts onto, but that might strip the threads.
 
  #6  
Old 06-11-11, 02:53 PM
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Does your faucet look like this?

(Image courtesy of candlecauldren.com)

You have removed the handle and then the nut under the handle. The stem should unscrew from the body of the valve. Try re-installing the handle without the hex nut and unscrew the stem from the body.

HOWEVER, if your faucet looks like this:

(Image courtesy of drillspot.com) then you need to follow my second set of instructions.

If neither of these images are representative of your outside faucet then I need to see a picture of it to further guide you.

Follow these instructions to add a picture. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
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Old 06-13-11, 12:37 PM
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it doesn't look like either of those; it has a plastic cap on top
But I can't get the photos that I took onto this message.
But it looks more like the bottom picture. It only has one nut that looks like the lower nut in your picture- there is no nut directly under the handle.
 
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Old 06-13-11, 05:05 PM
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Does it look like this?

(Image courtesy of drillspot.com)
 
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Old 06-15-11, 02:32 PM
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THAT'S IT!
-So to review: I remove the handle, the nut under it and then I see the white Teflon packing block and don't know how to proceed from there.
 
  #10  
Old 06-15-11, 03:35 PM
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Put the handle back on without the "packing" nut and then unscrew the stem assembly while maintaining a slight outward pressure on the back of the handle. You will (or should) then have the entire "stem" assembly in your hand. If you then remove the handle you should be able to pull the Teflon packing block off of the stem. Apply a little plumber's grease (not automotive grease) to the stem where the Teflon rides and also to any screw threads you may see which could be just behind the Teflon or they could be at the far (internal) end. The threads may not be continuous but have longitudinal grooves cut into them. It only takes a small amount of grease, just a film.

There is also a slight chance that your particular faucet has an internal "snap ring" just in front of the Teflon packing that snaps into a groove machined in the body of the valve. It will be pretty obvious if it is there. I personally have never seen one like that but it is possible.

Pictures need to be first uploaded to a photo hosting site and then the public URL of the photo posted here or in the pop-up box that appears when you click on the "picture" icon (between the envelope and movie icons) above the main text box.
 
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Old 06-17-11, 08:35 AM
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thanks for all of the patience furd
and of course the helpful directions!
 
 

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