Lime Scale


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Old 06-06-11, 01:04 PM
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Lime Scale

We have a situation that involves limestone scale. We have about a 30" in diameter concrete pipe that carries water from water treatment where it went through a water softening process (SCU) to the place where we then use the softened water. But, the water softener does not take out the limestone and it scales along the sides of the concrete pipe. The last time it was cleaned was about 20 years ago and I am thinking that it is about due for another cleaning. The thing is that we want to keep it running, so we want to clean it without stopping the flow of the water. So the obvious solution would be to send some sort of acid in with the water to break apart the lime scale, but this will also cause concrete corrosion. We have come up with many ideas and have some that will work, but I would like to see what other people have to say.
 
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Old 06-06-11, 01:11 PM
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What are you using this water for? If you have to make it acidic to remove the limescale, then wouldn't that ruin whatever the water is being used for?
 
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Old 06-06-11, 01:59 PM
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Possible. But we are mostly concerned with corroding the concrete. After the concrete pipe, the pipes are all corrosion resistant for the most part. But it is the concrete we are worried about.
 
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Old 06-06-11, 02:28 PM
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Use a jetter...... Do I win the prize????

There is a formula. It depends on what your trying to clean.

Example:There are 28 gpm jetters at say 3000 psi, used to clean heavystuff and flush it down the line. Then there are 5 gpm units at 10000 psi, that will clear anything.

Talk to a jetter pro.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 06-06-11, 02:36 PM
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You should answer the question on what the water is used for. Very few homeowners would have a 30" diameter concrete pipeline and why wouldn't a softening system remove lime/minerals...that's what they do.

We're not here to help with homework projects.
 
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Old 06-06-11, 03:15 PM
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I agree with Gunguy, this is not a DIY homeowner project. You need to talk to your industrial water treatment company.
 
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Old 06-06-11, 03:36 PM
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Cool. thank you. That helps a lot. And this is not a homework project. It is my project for work and I was wondering what other people would think about it. Thanks for all your comments.
 
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Old 06-20-11, 03:45 PM
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Well, I am surely no expert, but you might try adding a weaker acid like hydrochloric acid a little at a time into the tanks before the water is pumped out in to the pipes and monitor the pH of the water so that it doesn't get down to a damaging level. I think that most concretes are good down to a pH of like 3 or 4. It might take awhile and I am no expert but thought I would interject my thoughts.
 
 

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