Safe Soldering


  #1  
Old 06-11-11, 12:35 PM
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Safe Soldering

I renovate my bathroom and the back wall under the sink has a 5/8Ē melamine + the 1/2" dry wall behind. The hot and cold water lines coming thru the wall are only 3-1/2Ē long with compression fitted shut off valves. To remove the 5/8Ē melamine I have to remove both shut off valves.

I donít want to re install compression fitted shut off valves, I prefer to use the ones which you solder and in addition I will not re install a melamine piece at the back wall, I will just repair the drywall and paint it.

The 3-1/2Ē pipes coming thru the wall are connected to a T on the vertical risers inside the wall. I prefer not to touch the Tís because I may not be able to push the pipes to re install new Tís. This means that the new valves I will solder will be about 1-1/2Ē away from the existing Tís.

By soldering the new valves 1-1/2Ē away from the existing Tís would this melt the solder on the existing Tís? In other words how far can you solder a new valve from an existing soldered join without disturbing the existing solder?

Thank you
 
  #2  
Old 06-11-11, 05:09 PM
H
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Think you are ok

I have never experienced a problem with melting out an adjacent joint. My question is why do you not want to put new compression stops on rather than soldering? The 1/4 turn units are cheap and much more easily serviced in the future.
 
  #3  
Old 06-11-11, 05:32 PM
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Hi.

Solder quickly. If your not that experienced, and may overheat slightly, wrap the tee with a wet rag. That will keep the heat off.

Also take the valve apart when you solder, or open it. You can melt the internals.

Have a spray bottle of water handy. I alway had one. You never know. Something in the wall could catch fire. You can put it out quickly before disaster.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 06-11-11, 06:14 PM
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Sounds good Mike

Unfortunately I canít solder quickly as the valve body needs some heat before she takes any solder. I will use ball shut off valves which require only keeping them open during soldering.

Nice tip to wrap the tee with a wet rag. Water spray is always close buy when I solder

Thank you
 
  #5  
Old 06-11-11, 06:24 PM
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Sorry Handyman, I didnít see your post before

A few years back I installed a sink in the garage and used compression fittings to connect to the water lines. It must have been about 3 years after I did this job and one night when I came home from work the garage floor was almost flooded from one of these compression fittings. Talking to some friends I was told that these fittings are made in China and some times they can develop a crack Ė I guess thatís what happened in my case.

Since then I never used them, feel safer with a soldered join
 
  #6  
Old 06-12-11, 07:58 AM
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If you don't have a MAPP torch, now might be the time to get one. Higher heat will allow you to solder heavier fittings like a valve in much less time. In tight spots I will double up heavy duty tin foil and tack it behind the joint I'm soldering to protect the wall or insulation.
 
  #7  
Old 06-12-11, 08:38 AM
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Didnít know about the MAPP torch, I have a soldering set I bought about 30 years ago and just keep changing the propane tank when needed but the MAPP sound a good deal. I guess itís time for a change.

Thanks Wayne
 
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Old 06-12-11, 09:57 AM
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Get one with a adjustable flame. Its good to have. They are alittle more but worth it. The others are simply on/off. They are not turbo tips so no need to worry about burning them out.

Mike NJ
 
  #9  
Old 06-12-11, 11:10 AM
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hi kolias Ė

I got advice on the forum not too long ago suggesting the use of a MAPP torch. Wow! What a difference. I found it takes no time to heat up a 3/4 inch valve and be ready to solder. I couldnít believe the difference. Like you I was using a propane torch. (I also didnít have an on/off trigger which made things more difficult.) Seemed like it took forever to heat up a valve. In fact one time when I first started soldering, I gave up on a valve because (I thought) I couldnít get the valve hot enough.

I donít know what the proís think about this, but Iíve seen advice that says keep a fire extinguisher close by and a bucket of water. (My sisters eyes almost popped out when I sat them out when doing a job for her!). I always have the extinguisher and the bucket close by. But it sounds like the spray bottle idea is better than a bucket of water, much better control.

Good luck!
 
 

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