Undoing Old Pipes

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Old 07-25-11, 11:05 AM
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Undoing Old Pipes

I am remodeling a small apartment that was built in the early fifties. I need to replace bathtub fixtures and tap into pipes that go to the bathroom sink to instal pipes for a washer. I bought a pipe wrench and have used WD40 liberally, none of the pipes will budge. The pipes are galvanized iron, I think. Does anyone have any tips, or should I just call plumber?

Thanks for any help.

Patsy
 
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Old 07-25-11, 11:46 AM
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A real penetrating lubricant might make a difference, WD40 is not up to this task.
 
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Old 07-25-11, 12:13 PM
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You don't say what size pipe wrench and it sounds like you only bought one. You often need one pipe wrench to hold one pipe while you unscrew another. You meed at least one 8" for small areas, one 12" for general use, and an 18" for those suckers that won't move. A piece of 1-1/2" X36" galvanized pipe for those really stubborn suckers. It can be used with any of the wrenches but be sure to not snap a pipe off. Unfortunately that is a judgment call that comes with experience.

I would suggest a non-chain pawn shop for any additional pipe wrenches you need. Check the jaws to be sure the teeth aren't wore down.

Or you could cut the pipes with a Sawzall and use Sharkbite fittings.
 
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Old 07-25-11, 12:31 PM
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Adding a pipe to the handle of the wrench to give you more leverage and might get it to budge. Another option is to heat the fitting with a torch to help break the bond.
 
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Old 07-25-11, 12:32 PM
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Hi,

Depending on what your doing its best to take the bathroom plumbing and cut it out and replace with PVC. IMO you are wasting time and effort trying to turn out any of the old steel pipe.

Pics will help.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 07-25-11, 01:28 PM
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Lawrosa, sounds like a good idea, but how would I join the two?
 
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Old 07-25-11, 02:08 PM
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I dont know how much you want to cut out, but cut the pipe with a sawzall and convert with a rubber no hub. Make sure the nohub has the metal band around it and a stop inside the no hub where the two pipes butt up to each other.



Mike NJ
 
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Old 07-25-11, 02:28 PM
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Originally Posted by lawrosa View Post
I dont know how much you want to cut out, but cut the pipe with a sawzall and convert with a rubber no hub. Make sure the nohub has the metal band around it and a stop inside the no hub where the two pipes butt up to each other.
I thought he was working on the pressure side?
 
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Old 07-25-11, 03:06 PM
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I need to replace bathtub fixtures and tap into pipes that go to the bathroom sink to instal pipes for a washer.
I thought he was working on the pressure side?

Oh he could be. If so i would still take it back to a trunk line and covert to copper. But something will need to be unthreaded.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 07-25-11, 05:19 PM
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I am thinking about 6 feet. Would it be safe to close the wall up with this tiype of join? Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 07-25-11, 05:28 PM
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Hi patsy44, are we talking water pipe of drain pipe?

Yes you can put that no hub in the wall and close it. Make sure you have the proper support brakets.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 07-25-11, 05:48 PM
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This is water supply pipe for the bathroom.

Pat
 
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Old 07-25-11, 06:27 PM
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Originally Posted by patsy44 View Post
This is water supply pipe for the bathroom.

Pat
Mike was thinking you meant drain. The no-hub is a drain fitting not a water pipe fitting.
 
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Old 07-25-11, 06:54 PM
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If water pipe you need to turn it out. This type of piping is better to replace with copper or pex. Take it back to the trunk line at least.

As far as doing the minimal and trying to turn it out, you may need a 18" or 24" to get enough leverage. Or use a smaller wrench with a breaker bar.

You may bend/crush the pipe while doing this. You will be commited then. Make sure you have a back up plan.

It may resort to cutting the pipe at the tee or whatever fitting you are trying to turn it out of and carfully chip the threaded part out after making careful inside cuts.

If you dont know what I am talking about you best call a pro.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 07-25-11, 09:09 PM
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Thank you all very much. I will try this. My backup plan is to call a pro.

Pat
 
 

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