Drain For Garage Sink & Standing Pipe

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Old 09-27-11, 03:36 PM
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Question Drain For Garage Sink & Standing Pipe

I am in the process of installing a sink in my garage and I will be trying the drain into the 3” vertical drain that services a toilet, tub and sink in the bathroom above. There was a standing pipe connected to the 3” vertical drain via a 3”x3”x2” santee which I will use to connect the new sink and a standing pipe. Because there is no practical way to connect into an existing vent or run a new vent I will use a Studor Mini-Vent.

Does anyone here see any code conflicts for the components and arrangement I propose?

Thanks for taking the time to read my post and consider my questions.



 
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Old 09-27-11, 04:18 PM
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It will be venting inside the garage. That could be a violation. However, the entire job may require a permit, so I wouldn't worry about it.
 
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Old 09-27-11, 04:29 PM
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I checked with our County Building Department and an AAV is acceptable in a garage.
 
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Old 09-27-11, 07:48 PM
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I'm not too hip on codes and such, speshully over on the other coast, but to me it doesn't look like a proper install on the original. Is that a regular TEE on the 3" stack? Shouldn't that have been a sanitary tee to start with? Or is it? Can't tell in the pic.

Is there no cleanout on that stack before it enters the slab? Might wanna add one.

Lastly, what do you guess will happen if that stack develops a backup below where the tee is? I can tell you that I'm glad I won't be around when it happens!

Oh... whatever you do, make sure you leave a proper air gap between the softener drain and the stand pipe.

But, for all I know, it might be code...
 
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Old 09-27-11, 08:13 PM
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Hi,

It all looks ok but, the studor vent needs to be 3ft above the flood plane of the sink. Thats the code as I know it. If studors are allowed in your area then use it. But like I said 3 ft avove the rim of the sink.

Second I dont think you need that long sweep for the studor. A ty will be fine. ( Sanitary tee ). Plus that sweep looks like it will bring the studor vent under the sink. You need to pipe it up along side the sink. It looks like it will be close, but you can probably move the sink over a tad.

Third I would probably use a laundry sink which is alittle bigger, (taller) and scratch the stand pipe for the softner. Have the softner drain into the sink. Kind of like a washer does. Then add a C/O on the ty run. This way you can get a snake down there if there is not a clean out on that 3" line already.

This way if there is a clogg the sink will take up some of the water before there is a major flood.

Just my opinion and thats how I would do it.

Dont forget ABS glue only.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 09-28-11, 08:06 PM
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Originally Posted by lawrosa View Post
Hi,

It all looks ok but, the studor vent needs to be 3ft above the flood plane of the sink. Thats the code as I know it. If studors are allowed in your area then use it. But like I said 3 ft avove the rim of the sink.

Second I dont think you need that long sweep for the studor. A ty will be fine. ( Sanitary tee ). Plus that sweep looks like it will bring the studor vent under the sink. You need to pipe it up along side the sink. It looks like it will be close, but you can probably move the sink over a tad.

Third I would probably use a laundry sink which is alittle bigger, (taller) and scratch the stand pipe for the softner. Have the softner drain into the sink. Kind of like a washer does. Then add a C/O on the ty run. This way you can get a snake down there if there is not a clean out on that 3" line already.

This way if there is a clogg the sink will take up some of the water before there is a major flood.

Just my opinion and thats how I would do it.

Dont forget ABS glue only.

Mike NJ
Mike,

Thanks for your input. I am in California and just learned I will not be permitted to wet vent the 2" drain for the stand pipe. I also got my hands on a copy of the chapter on venting from the California plumbing code and it says I cannot run the vent pipe horizontal until I am 6” above the flood-level rim of the fixture served. Sounds like my only option is to install separate Studor vents for each P-Trap. NOTE: All drainpipes will be exposed within the garage (not inside the stud bays) and the stud bays will be sheathed with 3/8” structural sheathing and 5/8” fire code drywall to maintain fire rating between my garage and the adjoining townhouse garage.

According to Studor the Mini-Vent should be located a minimum of 4” above the weir of the fixture trap so both Mini-Vents can be located under the sink.

Regarding the sink. I really like the wall mount stainless steel design and I don’t want to change to a laundry sink. I also don’t want the discharge from the softener and water heater to go into the sink.

Below is my revised plan.



 
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Old 09-29-11, 03:20 PM
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One small point about the water heater condensate... not sure if you will have an issue here but be aware that the condensate is ACIDIC and can damage certain types of pipe... maybe not the ABS, but check to be sure. The solution would be to use a neutralizer on the condensate drain.

[edit: just to be sure we are both talking about the same thing... you said CONDENSATE, and I'm thinking that you mean the condensate from a high efficiency gas fired water heater's COMBUSTION process... but looking at the last pic, I see what looks like a water heater drain pan on the right... are you talking about water that might collect in that drain pan? there's no issue with acidity there... but neither should you get condensate forming and collecting in that pan either... please clarify]

I think that BOTH of the Studors need to be at the same height... but Mikey is the expert on codes...
 
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Old 09-29-11, 03:42 PM
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You only need one studor vent. You piping design is making it complicated.

This is how it should be to make it easy. Sorry for the quick paint edit. Its not as nice as your diagram. I would pipe the vent 3 ft above the rim of the sink.

Also there is nothing wrong with your design mechanically. That whole set up you have is how bathroom groups are plumbed.

If you can visulize say the stand pipe trap is a shower or tub, then the sink always dumps into that, and the 2" where your arrow comes out would go to the 3x2 Y for the toilet. And normally the vent would tie into the stack 3 ft above the flood plane.



Mike NJ
 

Last edited by lawrosa; 09-29-11 at 03:59 PM.
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Old 10-02-11, 09:24 AM
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Good Morning Mike,

Sorry I could not respond sooner, but I had an emergency that had to be attended to and it took a few days to address.

Thank you, I really appreciate you taking the time to modify my picture and provide valuable comments.

I spoke with our County Building Department and learned I would not be able to use an AAV unless it was absolutely impossible to vent to the roof. In that case they would issue a variance. I have no desire to use an AAV and now believe I can get up to the attic via a chase in the corner if I build a ceiling soffit.

Below is a configuration I would like to implement. I should be able to squeak by through the narrow space between the sink edge and the drywall box I have to build around the 3” vertical drain. Does the vent pipe exiting the Santee have to be 2” or will 1-1/2” suffice? I am in California and I could not find anything in the code that prevents vertical wet venting in this configuration for the standing pipe. NOTE: This standing pipe will not be used for a washing machine.

Do you see any problems with my configuration or see a better way to accomplish this?

Thanks again.

Howard

 
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Old 10-02-11, 09:31 AM
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Hi,

That vent cam be 1 1/2 right out of the ty. Use a 2 x 1 1/2 bushing.

Also instead of going out the roof and cutting a hole you can tie into the stack thats up in the attic. Use a 3 x 1 1/2 ty. ( San tee)

Looks good.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 10-02-11, 09:33 AM
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Originally Posted by NJ Trooper View Post
One small point about the water heater condensate... not sure if you will have an issue here but be aware that the condensate is ACIDIC and can damage certain types of pipe... maybe not the ABS, but check to be sure. The solution would be to use a neutralizer on the condensate drain.

[edit: just to be sure we are both talking about the same thing... you said CONDENSATE, and I'm thinking that you mean the condensate from a high efficiency gas fired water heater's COMBUSTION process... but looking at the last pic, I see what looks like a water heater drain pan on the right... are you talking about water that might collect in that drain pan? there's no issue with acidity there... but neither should you get condensate forming and collecting in that pan either... please clarify]

I think that BOTH of the Studors need to be at the same height... but Mikey is the expert on codes...
Thank you for your comments.

The discharge from the condensing water heater is mildly acidic and will be pumped to the ABS standing pipe. It will not drain to the aluminum water heater pan.

Regarding the Studors, I will not be using them and I will find a way to make a standard vent work.
 
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Old 10-02-11, 09:48 AM
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Originally Posted by lawrosa View Post
Hi,

That vent cam be 1 1/2 right out of the ty. Use a 2 x 1 1/2 bushing.

Also instead of going out the roof and cutting a hole you can tie into the stack thats up in the attic. Use a 3 x 1 1/2 ty. ( San tee)

Looks good.

Mike NJ

Mike,

I think I will use a 1-1/2 x 1/1/2 x 2” Santee for the sink drain instead of a reducer. The vent for the 3” waste drain in the attic is actually 2” and I will tie in with a 1-1/2 x 2” Santee.

Thank you very much.

Howard
 
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Old 10-02-11, 11:29 AM
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I know probably typo but you mean 1-1/2 x 2 x 1-1/2. The bull is always the last measurment.

And also the 2 x 2 x 1- 1/2 santee in attic.

But now that its not 3 " you probably need to go through the roof. If its 2" how many fixtures are on that stack? You can only have so many fixtures on a vent. And since its 2" it makes it less. ( Odd that its 2". Your sure).

Because know you are basically adding two fixtures, even though one is just condensate. But you would need to check the code and count the fixtures. Then campare with code.

Would it matter? Possibly not but code is code.

Mike NJ
 
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