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At what height should I install my Check Valve in the discharge line (Sump Pump)

At what height should I install my Check Valve in the discharge line (Sump Pump)

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  #1  
Old 09-28-11, 08:52 AM
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At what height should I install my Check Valve in the discharge line (Sump Pump)

I recently purchased a few items to upgrade my 20 year old sump pump arrangement in the basement.

This is what I have, now:
An "old syle" pedistal type (probably not the right terminology) 1/3 HP pump with a 104" vertical 1 1/2" discharge line (before the elbow that directs through a wall) with NO check valve, consequently, there is always 9" of water in the crock because at least 1 1/2" X 104" of water falls back into the crock when the pump shuts off (shwoosh!). I won't tell you how long I have put up with that unnecessary noise!

I went a bit past the "basics" and purchased a 1-1/2" Silencer Sump Pump Check Valve
and a 1/2-HP Utilitech/Wayne Stainless Steel 70 GPM Submersible Sump Pump.

I am about to go to HD to purchase a new 1 1/2" threaded fitting to screw into the discharge connection of the pump and some PVC adhesive, but before I go any further, I want to determine at what height I should cut the current verticle PVC discharge pipe so that I don't cut the pipe at the wrong height, anticipating the installation of the check valve. May I please ask for advice, here? Thanks.
 
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  #2  
Old 09-28-11, 10:50 AM
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Well I doubt you waited for an answer before going to the home depot but here are my thoughts.
I would cut the pipe 3 feet above the floor and install a union. Then install the check valve right at the pump. Then take the lower half of pipe (from the union down) and cut it to the proper length to fit to the check valve. This way if you ever need to remove the pump to work on it you do not have to cut the pipe again.
 
  #3  
Old 09-28-11, 11:22 AM
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glad I waited for a reply.

That's a GREAT idea! I wouldn't have thought of that and, no, I haven't left for HD, yet. But, now I'll go, armed with more (your) innovation! I really appreciate your input!

So, it's okay to have the water sitting in the upper section of the vertical dischage pipe, above the check valve? Should I still put a small, angled venting hole in the discharge pipe as suggested by someone else, online, to prevent "airlock." Here is what they said. I copied and pasted it, here:

If you have a check valve in the system make sure your 3/16" vent hole has been drilled in the pipe between the Pumps Discharge and the check valve and it is not clogged. If it has not been drilled, disconnect the pump from your power source and drill the hole.

If I install a threaded junction to allow a future disconnect that is lower than the check valve, should I still put one of these venting holes somewhere below the check valve? And, doesn't 3/16" sound pretty large for a venting hole? Thanks
 
  #4  
Old 09-28-11, 12:14 PM
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My sump is set up as Ben described with the check valve just above the pump and a union a couple of feet above it. I installed it that way 25 years ago. As far as I know it does not have a vent hole unless it was part of the pump.

I admit I can't figure out why one is needed.
 
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Old 09-28-11, 02:26 PM
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The need for the 3/16" weep hole is to keep the pump unit from getting "air-locked". When a submersible unit is installed with a check-valve in the pipe, there has to be a way for the air to vent out of the discharge pipe (between the discharge and the bottom of the check valve). If this hole is not there, the air that is trapped under the check valve will become pressurized and in essence block the pipe. This will cause the pump to run, however little or no water will be moved through the discharge because the air will be blocking the line. It is true, that there is a small amount of water that will come out of the vent hole when the unit is pumping. This is true with all submersible pumps, regardless of manufacture.

From Dunbar Plumbing .com


Also when you drill the hole drill it on a angle so the water will spray down when the pump is running. Drill it with in 6" of where the discharge comes out of the pump.

And 3/16 is not too big.


Mike NJ
 
  #6  
Old 09-28-11, 04:13 PM
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I have to disagree about the vent hole. My check valve actually screws into the pump and a rubber hose type fitting goes to the vertical pipe. Then 3 feet above that is my union.
Unless your pump specified that the vent hole is needed do not put a hole in the pipe. The instructions that came with the pump should state how they suggest to install the system.
Some older pumps did specify the hole was needed but most new pumps do not need the hole. Check the instructions that came with the pump.
Lawrosa, does the article you quote have a date on it? It may be an out of date article that no longer is relative due to improvements in sump pumps.
 
  #7  
Old 09-28-11, 05:30 PM
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No all pumps need the hole as far as I know.

But the newer pumps being manufatured have the hole built into the body if I remember correctly. I remember the guys drilling the hole, running the pump, and you would see two streams of water...LOL.

They have had pumps with the hole built in for yrs, but not all do it. I believe the cast iron variety dont, because they would rust closed.

My check valve actually screws into the pump and a rubber hose type fitting goes to the vertical pipe.
Is this how you did it? I dont think I ever seen a check valve installed below the possible water level. But possibly some of the check valves have the hole, if I remeber correctly, and that they come with the pump.

I have installed many pumps without the hole because I forgot. I got called back on a few of those for failure to pump.

But as long as I been a plumber drilling the hole is the norm.



Mike NJ
 
  #8  
Old 09-28-11, 07:21 PM
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Mike - I did not drill a vent hole in my pump (Floatec) discharge line. That set up is 25 years old (on my 3rd pump) and it's moved a whole bunch of water in that time.

I went downstairs and lifted my pump. The vent is predrilled in the check valve body by the manufacturer. So as Ben said - check the install instructions. My Floatec pump says drill a 1/8" relief hole but the check valve that I bought with the pump says it isn't necessary.
 
  #9  
Old 09-29-11, 09:41 AM
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Job Completed- Thanks

After removing the old sump pump, I found that the bottom of the crock had what appeared to be an out-of-level surface because someone had put a roofing shingle on the bottom to cover mud, rocks, and broken pieces of old sump pumps. I cleaned out what what I could. What's with some people?!!!
After I cleaned out a fair amount of debris, mud, and rocks, I took an old, round, plastic auto oil collection tray that I had purchased at Pep Boys, years ago, and I cut the upper portion of the sides, leaving the bottom and about an inch height on the sides and placed that in the bottom of the crock and sat the new pump on it.
I did NOT drill a venting hole in the discharge pipe and I did NOT use a threaded junction in the discharge line as suggested by oneyeben because, if I ever need to pull the pump, everything below or including the check valve can be disconnected at the clamps for the check valve. I attempted to upload pics but, need some practice...didn't work. I slowly poured about three gallons of clean water into the crock to check the operation. Perfect and absolutely silent! I amazed myself, thanks to my new advisors!
Thank you all for your input. What's not to like about DIY forums?!!!
 

Last edited by papernpaste; 09-29-11 at 09:55 AM. Reason: text incomplete
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