Venting issue?

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Old 09-28-11, 10:19 AM
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Venting issue?

When I shower and especially when draining after bathing, both my toilets gurgle. Then after showering or draining I cannot think of flushing either toilet or they'll overflow out the bowl (this is only recently but has always gurgled) for about 2 or so hours afterward. And, when no shower or bath has been used, whenever I flush either toilet I hear a gurgle through the tub drain - no backup water, just gurgle noise. Setup is: full bath on second floor, half-bath on main floor and laundry in basement, kitchen on main floor on opposite end of home as both baths and laundry. History is: my jack-of-all-trades grandfather and my uncle, resting in peace, built the home back in the fifites when they certainly did not have the qualifications to do so...but, you know the story. For what it's worth, I see only one vent pipe from out of the roof, basically right above the kitchen but see none such at the opposite end of the home (on the end where the baths and laundry are) and it wouldn't surprise me if there is no vent pipe for the bath end. Could this be the problem? FYI, the home has always been in the family but I've owned the home for five years and have always had this trouble, only in varying degrees with progressively worsening conditions as time moves on.
 
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Old 09-28-11, 10:35 AM
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Hi,

Yes you probably need to bring it to code for it to drain properly. Whats happening is the traps are being siphoned out probably due to lake of proper venting.

Sewer gas can make you sick, and cause death in certain circumstances, and methane gas is explosive.

This would be a large undertaking, such as wall opening, etc...

Have you looked in the attic to see if any vents are up there, or confirm that its just the one for the kitchen? Sometimes you cant see them from the roof, but I dont know your set up.

Let us know.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 09-28-11, 12:25 PM
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I agree that you have a vent problem but don't be so quick to assume that the builders got it wrong. It is not unusual that a house built in the 50's would have only one roof vent.

As Mike said, you need to look into the attic to see what you have. Some houses have a single vent that is fed by vent pipes from different areas of the house. It's quite possible that one of the vent lines is clogged.

If you find that there is no vent for the bathroom that is giving you problems, then you will have to add one. Depending on your situation that may be difficult or very difficult but certainly doable for a DIYer.

Post back with what you find.
 
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Old 09-29-11, 05:20 AM
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Thank-you both; the trouble I will run in to is that there is no attic or crawl space above that end of the house - it is in the dormer area or a Cape Cod style home. Looks like I'll have to open 'er up! Yeeha...and yipes.
 
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Old 09-29-11, 06:28 AM
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What size is the vent on the roof?

Most cape style homes I know are smaller homes and all the plumbing is tied into the one stack. The baths and kitchen were central located.

Did you have any additions added?

Mike NJ
 
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Old 10-01-11, 05:24 AM
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Without getting up on the roof and measuring, I'd say the single vent on the kitchen end of the home is 2". As for additions; not that I'm aware of. But that's not to say that the house wasn't built in sections over time - probably a ten year span I would guess as it appears that roof lines and walls don't flow well. If you knew my grandfather you'd understand. For instance, the shop that I run, which is a three generation business, is currently a 3000 square foot building that, over a 10 year span - when first opened up, grew with shapes that don't make sense and now the structure is costing me money to solve a lot of issues as a result of the jack-of-all-trades construction methods.
 
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