PEX or copper?

Reply

  #41  
Old 11-01-11, 07:07 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 9,802
Likes Received: 7
If I were looking for a new home today, I would be looking for a home with pex. I as a plumber would hope never to see copper again if I could help it.
But, what do potential new home buyers look for? Do they look at copper as something of more value than pex? Do they look at copper as something that will last longer and be more substantial?
 
Sponsored Links
  #42  
Old 11-01-11, 07:23 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 9,802
Likes Received: 7
Whenever new products or processes hit the street there is always some blowback. I remember my uncle the plumber complaining about plastic drain pipe years ago. He was convinced that the widespread use of plastic in DWV systems would be the downfall of the plumbing trade.
That would be kind of like when the paint roller was invented. That being said, it still takes some skill to do a nice paint job with a roller and many DIYers don't do that kind of quality job. The same goes for plastic drain lines. It has and always will take skill to do it right. Whether a drain stack or a sweated copper plumbing system, correctly done, both are an art even today.
 
  #43  
Old 11-01-11, 07:54 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,722
Likes Received: 2
But, what do potential new home buyers look for? Do they look at copper as something of more value than pex? Do they look at copper as something that will last longer and be more substantial?
If your an average homeowner you look to see how big the kitchen is, and if your furniture will fit. Then they check the yard. Most could care less what type plumbing, or heating is in the home unless they are told or its brought to thier attention. All most care about is if everything works and nothing is broken.

When I went house hunting my wife went one way, and I always went the other or into the basement. I had a realtor tell me "Oh theres nothing down there. Just the heating system and water heater" I said, "well yeah, thats what I want to see"

My wife thought I was crazy when we were house hunting because I really did not care about the room layouts and was more interested in mechanicals. Heat, water, roof,windows, etc....

"Honey, look at the kitchen"... blah, blah.."Sir can you tell me more about that 50 yr old boiler down there?"

Mike NJ
 
  #44  
Old 11-01-11, 09:03 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,407
Likes Received: 2
I agree with Mike, it is a very rare person that looks at the structural design and integrity of a home, the plumbing or mechanical systems, the materials of construction or in other words, the "bones" of a house instead of the size and arrangement of the rooms and yard.

I suspect the reason why some real estate ads make a point of mentioning copper piping is really decades old. Back some fifty years (more or less depending on the area) and longer ago homes were routinely plumbed with galvanized steel supply piping and a combination of steel and cast iron drainage piping. It was a premium house that had copper supply and a mansion if it had copper drainage piping. The life expectancy of steel piping was considered to be maybe in the range of thirty to fifty years before replacement was necessary whereas the copper was forever.

I think the emphasis on copper piping in advertising IS important IF the house being listed dates to an era when steel piping was the norm but otherwise is of little importance.

Today, as it has been for at least the last thirty years, most house are built "on spec" meaning that no buyer has purchased the home before construction. A stock architectural plan is used, maybe with some minor modifications and then a number of homes are built in an area and then sold. Sometimes the interior finishes and appliances are left until a buyer if found and the buyer is able to specify their preference from a limited list or can go outside the list for an additional cost.

Every geographical area is different in terms of what the market will bear as far as costs but in my area custom homes (where a person hires an architect or design-build company) have a starting price in excess of a half-million dollars. That is pretty much out of the ballpark for most people so they have to settle for a "spec" (built on the speculation of being able to sell at a profitable price) home or a used home. I can pretty much guarantee that any newly built spec home will NOT have copper plumbing unless the local codes prohibit PEX.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes