Drilling hole for 3" pipes-alternate methods

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Old 10-11-11, 10:28 AM
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Drilling hole for 3" pipes-alternate methods

Is there any way to easily drill holes thru 2x4 or 2x6 without using "widowmaker" hole saws?

I know sawzall may be an option, but are there any attachments that can make it easier to use the hole saws?

 
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Old 10-11-11, 10:46 AM
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I'm not sure what a widow maker hole saw is but all I ever use is a hole saw. You just have to have a drill capable of driving it. If the hole saw is stalling and your drill torque is trying to break your wrist you may be using it wrong.
 
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Old 10-11-11, 11:10 AM
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hi guys –

I’m a know-nothing newbie, so this may be way wrong. But is it proper to drill a 3”+ hole in a 2x4 or 2x 6? Or does it just depend on what the load on that wood is ?
 
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Old 10-11-11, 11:58 AM
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It's actually the top or bottom plates which are nailed to floor or hold up ceiling.
The holes are for 3" PVC drains. The holes need to be closer to 4" which is even worse.
 
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Old 10-11-11, 04:42 PM
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I don't think a 3" PVC pipe will fit in a standard 2x4 framed wall. If it does, it just fits if it's centered perfectly. If possible, you should try to frame out a 2x6 wall. Also, don't forget nailing plates. When it's that close to the edge, it's real easy for a drywall screw to go through it.

As for making the hole, I too use a standard (sharp) hole saw. It's sometimes easier if you use a drill that has a side handle so you can get a better hold of it. I usually just use my 3/8" drill and let it rest after 2 holes. I haven't bothered to upgrade to a 1/2" drill (which I probably should).

Also, if you're worried about the drill spinning, wear a pair of gloves. It'll help save your knuckles if you lose concentration for a moment and the drill does spin.
 
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Old 10-11-11, 05:53 PM
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And use a minimum of a 1/2" corded drill with a side handle.
 
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Old 10-11-11, 06:12 PM
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This is the widowmaker I remember.





The ol' "Hole Hawg" !!!!

I saw many plumbers break arms, wrists, get knock off ladders, etc....

Most were not pretty.

If I did not have a brace/support to lean the handle on, I often made one. You will not hold this boy back.

Aside from the hole hawg the standard right angle drill was my tool of choice. Gee, going back to about 1983-84 during my rough-in days. If it caught on you you were able to muscle it.

Dont do much drilling today. All cordless stuff now. Funny though as I remember milwaukee was the only power tools back then that were any good. Hilti, and I think Thakita's were just coming out 1985 or so but they were garbage back then and I believe they still are.


Standard plumbers rough-in drill.



Mike NJ
 
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Old 10-11-11, 08:59 PM
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Geeze Mike you are giving me drill envy.
 
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Old 10-11-11, 11:33 PM
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Plus when you drill with a hole saw you dont drill all the way through at once. You stop and chisel some of the wood out of the hole your drilling. The sides of the hole saw will not bind up as much.

Mike NJ
 
 

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