Low water pressure


  #1  
Old 01-11-01, 05:26 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thumbs down

I have been having trouble with my hot water pressure being to low. Hope you can give me some advice in this matter.
 
  #2  
Old 01-11-01, 05:48 PM
Mike Swearingen's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Northeastern NC On The Albemarle Sound
Posts: 10,948
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Cool

Do ALL of your hot water lines have low pressure at all fixtures?
Hot water pressure is normally driven by the cold water pressure going into the heater. Is the cold water supply valve on the heater fully open?
 
  #3  
Old 01-13-01, 10:54 AM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
2 Comments - First, depending on the hardness of the water where you live, galvanized water line (if that's what you have) is VERY prone to becoming clogged with minerals that leach from the water and build up in the pipe. Hot water lines are worse because hot water carries more dissolved minerals in solution. As it moves through the pipe and cools, it is more likely than cold water to leave deposits behind. Second (and at the risk of having the experienced plumbers here start yelling like crazy), there is a fix for this. (WARNING: It isn't for the meek, however, and could be EXTREMELY dangerous!!) I have had great success restoring water pressure by backflushing galvanized water lines with muriatic acid to remove this mineral buildup. In fact, I've avoided having water lines replaced and was able to re-establish 100% water pressure to faucets that just trickled. Note that muriatic acid will eat through a galvanized pipe in just a few minutes if not flushed out. Also, the reaction of the acid with the sediment can be somewhat violent. Pour some vinegar on a little baking soda if you want a safe demonstration of this. I am NOT recommending this method to anyone. I readily admit that it is dangerous and potentially costly if pipes are damaged. Just relating my personal experience.
 
  #4  
Old 01-13-01, 03:11 PM
Mike Swearingen's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Northeastern NC On The Albemarle Sound
Posts: 10,948
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Cool

Muriatic ACID? In residential water pipes?

Do NOT try this at home folks, unless your beneficiary is me, and that's spelled...O...L...D...G...U...Y. (and I didn't get this way backflushing poisonous acid into my drinking water pipes).

LexusKy, you are one radical dude, if you're not just jerking our chain. Sorry, but I find that just a little too hard to believe.

LOL

 
  #5  
Old 01-13-01, 03:33 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Lake Murray, SC USA
Posts: 1,461
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I totally agree with OLD GUY. Do NOT introduce any acid into your potable water supply. If the problem is galvanized pipes (most likely), it is much safer to do a partial replacement of the pipes, starting at the piping closest to the faucet assemblies with the lowest flow.

I have done this, and you can double your water flow by just replacing the last 10 feet of galvanized piping before it goes into a faucet.
 
  #6  
Old 01-13-01, 03:52 PM
Mike Swearingen's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Northeastern NC On The Albemarle Sound
Posts: 10,948
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Cool

Right on, Rick.
In the first place, most of the scale inside galvanized pipes is hard metallic buildup from the pipe itself, combined with only a little bit of mineral buildup.
However, I "agree" with LexusKy, IF you put muriatic acid into one, it would definitely clean it out (probably along with everyone in your family).
Sheeze!
 
  #7  
Old 01-13-01, 04:27 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
How did I know that the acid idea was gonna be a hot one? (Pun intended!!) The buildup in water lines is going to vary by location, of course. In KY, for instance, it's mainly lime scale which the acid takes out very quickly. (And, no, I'm not kidding.) Again, I am NOT recommending this method to anyone and have only used it myself as a last resort when actually replacing pipes was impractical. (I'm an old home fanatic and necessity - and high school chemistry - is the mother of invention.) One other note - Muriatic (hydrochloric) acid is used routinely to control the PH in swimming pools. It's VERY nasty stuff in its concentrated form, but is highly soluable and is quickly diluted in water. And, in fact, the reaction that removes the minerals in pipes is actually neutralizing the acid. IT STILL AIN'T SAFE THOUGH!!!! That reaction, if it remains unchecked and the metal in the pipes becomes involved, evolves hydrogen gas. Remember the Hindenburg? REAL plumbers are much less expensive than doctors (or life insurance policies).
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: