Pain in the *&% Diverter Valve

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-17-01, 02:35 PM
B
BGH
BGH is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Rochester, NY USA
Posts: 123
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question

This weekend I plan on attacking a problem that I have posted on here before: my shower diverter valve. I know this needs to be replaced as water runs out both the faucet and shower head. Interesting Note: the water that runs out of the faucet when taking a shower is HOT. Consequently I run out of the hot H2O quickly.

The big problem is this: the locknut that attaches the diverter valve is almost welded on. I'm not sure if it's because the plumbing is old (guess: 30 years old) or due to all the deposits that have formed in the nut's threads. Anyways, I CAN'T REMOVE THIS NUT IN ORDER TO MAKE THIS SIMPLE REPAIR!!!!!!

I have used some previous suggestions to no avail. I have also bought something called CRT (CRL?) and have applied it once and will do so again this weekend.

Somebody recommended heating the nut with a propane torch, but this nut is recessed into the shower wall and I'm affraid I might actually burn it. Instead I plan to heat it with a heat gun.

Any other suggestions before I jump into this project?? What would a plumber do if he encountered a similar problem with a locknut? Please feel free to give any and all suggestions as I would like to tackle this otherwise easy job of diverter valve replacement.

Thanks in advance for all help.

Brian
 
  #2  
Old 01-17-01, 04:49 PM
Plumber2000's Avatar
Member
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 5,838
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Get yourself a good set of these sockets, ,that stem will remove from there.

Have not found a stem that will not remove.

Plumber2000

 
  #3  
Old 01-18-01, 07:07 AM
B
BGH
BGH is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Rochester, NY USA
Posts: 123
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I actually went out a bought those very same sockets - to NO avail. Maybe it's because I'm affraid to apply too much pressure. When I was working with those sockets before and tugging, I noticed all attached pipes would pull and move. Is this OK? Should I be concerned??

Thanks
 
  #4  
Old 01-18-01, 07:42 AM
Plumber2000's Avatar
Member
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 5,838
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Before you get into applying lots of pressure, make sure you have the water off to the house, and that you can access the valve on the back side of that wall, if something does give out, you will need to get at the valve.

Is this valve attached to copper pipe, galvinized or cpvc?

It should not shift too much if galvinized.

Some older valves require that you have the handle in the on position, so on the diverter turn it all the way to the right.

Set the socket on, get a good cresant wrench and a hammer, use the hammer to apply swift blows to the cresant wrench, this will help in freeing the stuck on stem.

Good Luck

Plumber2000

 
  #5  
Old 01-18-01, 10:00 AM
Johnboy555's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Lake Forest, California (Orange county)
Posts: 109
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
KEEP A TORCH AWAY FROM THE WALLS!!! As one who's witnessed a house almost burned to the ground by someone (I won't give him the honour of calling him a plumber..) tried to use a torch through the hole on a shower faucet!

There is a product that I've found works better than WD-40, or Rust-Buster, for freeing up rusted on, or corroded nuts etc. It's called "PB Blaster" If you can find it (try an automotive store) Soak it, wait for about 15 min try it again.

If you can find a "box" wrench or even an "open end" wrench to put on the socket before using a hammer it would work a little better than a "Crescent" wrench. Otherwise Plumber2000 has good advice.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: