Leaking Valve on Outside Hose Connection Needs Replacing


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Old 07-25-12, 04:04 AM
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Leaking Valve on Outside Hose Connection Needs Replacing

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It's leaking in two places: the handle and where the pipe connects to the pipe coming out of the wall. (Forgive my ignorance. I don't know the specific names of this part).
Anyway, I'm assuming the entire piece, handle and pipe, needs replacing. I'm also assuming the piece requires soldering. Correct? If so, not a job I can do myself. What should I expect to pay for this?
Thank you.
 
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Old 07-25-12, 04:42 AM
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Those gate valves leak after time. I have a whole load of them in my house that I am slowly replacing.
Lucky for me, my outside valves where threaded, so I didn't have to worry about soldering those ones.
Yours looks soldered, and there isn't a lot of material to work with between the valve and the wall. I'm sure there are available products that will make this replacement possible without replacing the pipe coming out. I'm no plumber, so I can't recommend anything off the top of my head that I have experienece with.
Hopefully one of the experts pops on soon and has some good suggestions.
 
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Old 07-25-12, 06:23 AM
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Do you have access inside the house at this point? If so, you may be able to use a compression or SharkBite connector to a new valve outside. If you don't have access, it doesn't look like you have enough room for any kind of compression connector. You (or a plumber) will have to cut the pipe, clean it and resolder. It should be a quick project for a plumber, so you're likely not talking about a lot of $$ if needed.
 
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Old 07-25-12, 06:41 AM
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Unless the plumber can get desolder the valve (which might be tough givin it's condition), it'll probably require a replacement pipe from the inside.
Looking at the picture, I'm guessing there is less then 3/4" worth of pipe between the house and the valve.
 
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Old 07-25-12, 06:50 AM
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Looks like a old hose bib set up. Best bet is to remove it all and install a frost free hose bib with vacuum breaker. Get one the proper length to reach a workable location on the other-side of the wall. Or just add a length of copper onto the valve you replace it with.

 
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Old 07-25-12, 07:05 AM
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Thanks for the replies, gents. There is no access to that pipe inside the wall. Also, I'm in south Florida, if that matters.
It definitely is soldered. So if I understand what needs to be done, the old bibb needs to be cut off, put an extension on the pipe coming out of the wall, and then attach the new bibb?
 
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Old 07-25-12, 07:07 AM
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Yes but its probably best to open the wall on the other side and replace the through wall pipe with a proper hose bib.
 
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Old 07-25-12, 07:37 AM
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Yikes! The other side of the wall is a tiled bathroom. I would hate to have to tear that apart just to repair a leaking bibb.
 
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Old 07-25-12, 08:17 AM
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I'm not even sure that it is copper. It could be 1/2" steel pipe. That was common in Florida in older houses. Even after WWII was over, copper was pricey, and only rich yankees could afford copper.

Can't you cut around it from the outside to open it up enough to get inside where it is soldered? Then patch it?

Even if it is block, the plumbers cut open the concrete to open things up in my house when they replumbed this house. Then they patched it with cement. They didn't want to mess up the tile either because old tile is tough to match.
 
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Old 07-25-12, 08:25 AM
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Excuse my ignorance about all this, but that's why I'm here, to be educated on this.
But from this guy's eyes, I'm wondering why the old bibb just can't be removed and then replaced? Why is it necessary to cut into the wall and get at that pipe?
 
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Old 07-25-12, 09:00 AM
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Usually there is a shut off inside the home for that hose bib. Look under the sink. Or any access panel?

Yes you can just remove and replace. The pipe looks corroded close to the wall of the home, and possibly too close to sweat a fitting. If not skilled internal insulation can catch fire if the person is not skilled.

I am basing this on the pic.

Its often better from my experience to insert a new pipe and hose bib them make the final connection inside the home.
 
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Old 07-25-12, 12:56 PM
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The pipe looks rotten. If it is steel, then it will likely snap off when you unscrew the bibcock. If it is copper, then I don't think you can clean it up enough to get a good connection with a shark bite or solder it.
 
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Old 07-25-12, 01:08 PM
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Not a pro...but....this is what I see:

Stucco house, soldered on hose bibb; need to replace hose bibb without starting fire in wall.

get bucket of water with a rag.
get spray bottle of water and spray water into wall by pipe, just to remove dryness inside of wall.
get a piece of sheet metal, say 10" x 10", cut 1/2" slot in it so metal can be slid over pipe next to wall (heat shield), use cut off piece to further cover exterior wall.
Drain all water out of pipe, use compressed air to blow line out if possible.
Using torch with MATT gas, heat join, twist and pull on hose bibb to remove as solder flows.
Clean pipe with sand paper, wire brush.
Dry fit a male connector onto pipe.
remove connector and rosin the crap out of connector and pipe.
install connector.
heat with torch and solder
use rag out of bucket to cool joint.and surrounding area.
screw on new hose bibb, using backer wrench on pipe fitting.
turn on water and check for leaks.
No leaks, pat yourself on back.
Leaks...repeat procedure.

You should be able to get a good seal. If not, which would suck, remove everything and knock hole in outside wall. Look for a better place to make repair, if any.

The biggest factor I see here is getting all the water out of the pipe before you try to sweat the new fitting onto the pipe. If there is any water in the pipe, when you heat the pipe the water will turn to steam and blow past your solder, causing a hole/leak.
 
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Old 07-25-12, 01:08 PM
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"Usually there is a shut off inside the home for that hose bib."

Mike,
That must be an up north thing. I've lived in 5 houses in Florida and I have never seen a cutoff for outside bibcocks in any of them. They build 'em cheap down here.

I've never lived in any newish houses, only houses built 1920-1970 so they might be in the newer houses. This house, ca: 1953, was replumbed to code about 10 years ago and they didn't put any cutoffs on the bibcocks, so I have to shut off the whole house to repair one.

Oh, and this is one of the only places in the US, where concrete block houses are normal. Soft woods rot and termites luv 'em.
 
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Old 07-26-12, 06:33 AM
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Vey,
totally off topic here....
In the area around here, Sudbury (my home town) has been concrete block as standard for ~25years now. Everywhere else (including where I am now) is still poured concrete (which is way better).
 
 

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