Removing old gas pipe

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Old 10-25-12, 01:00 PM
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Removing old gas pipe

I currently have a gas pipe in my basement that I assume supplied the old boiler (now have gas furnace). The pipe coming into the house splits three different ways, and this is one of the pipes coming from that split. However, the pipe is much larger in diameter (maybe 2x a large) and the pipe coming in from the meter.

The pipe turns near the furnace and goes to the floor where it is capped. Nothing else connects to this pipe so I'd like to remove it, especially the vertical portion to free up space.

Are there any reasons why this pipe should be left alone. I'm not sure why it was capped when the boiler was removed, and why it wasn't at least cut and capped at the end of the horiziontal run.

Thanks
 
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Old 10-25-12, 01:05 PM
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You could probably remove it and cap it with no issue.

Your question though makes me wonder why that pipe is bigger then the main.

I would love to see pics of this. Boiler/furnace? Did they move to new location? Hmmm aside from a/c just wondering why you would get rid of the boiler? Much better heat IMO.
 
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Old 10-25-12, 01:40 PM
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Thanks. I will try to take a photo tonight.

I did not remove the boiler or radiators, they were gone when I bought the house. I assume it was just cheaper to bundle heat with a/c.
 
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Old 10-25-12, 03:01 PM
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Your question though makes me wonder why that pipe is bigger then the main.
I've wondered about this myself. The main at my place looks like 1 1/4 when it hits the meter it is reduced to 1/2" in and out then up to 3/4 for cooking and 1 1/2" for boiler. I assume is has to do with pressure vs volume?


 
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Old 10-25-12, 03:24 PM
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I would have to see what you are talking about.

Pics......
 
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Old 10-26-12, 08:11 AM
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Pictures are attached. The first shows where the incoming gas line splits off. The angled pipe on the far left is the pipe from the gas meter. The large pipe on the far right is the pipe I am asking about.

The second photo shows the pipe near the furnace.

Thanks
 
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