gluing wet PVC

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Old 12-07-12, 02:56 PM
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gluing wet PVC

I installed a check valve at my water meter and found out that the meter won't completely shut off. With the meter valve off there is still a steady dribble out of the meter. What I'd like to know is how detrimental that is to the glue joint. I'd guess the that the amount of water that goes past the shut off meter is somewhere around a gallon every 5-10 minutes.

I know I have to wait 2 hrs before turning the water back on, do I need to increase that time due to the wet joints?
 
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Old 12-07-12, 03:12 PM
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You have a PVC supply feed to your house? Which side of the meter did you put the check valve, house side?

If the glue does not hold, you will need to install a secondary shut off prior to installing your check valve. To do this, You will need an inflatable or expandable bladder that you can insert inside the pipe and inflate to stop the flow. Then you install a 2nd shut off, release the bladder, close the 2nd shut off and complete your connections.
 
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Old 12-07-12, 03:19 PM
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I installed the check valve right on my side of the meter. I'd probably be in trouble if I had messed with the supply side of the meter. I have about 400' or so of PVC going up to my house.

I never heard of the inflatable bladder, does it stay inside the pipe after the valve is installed? I don't guess that's something lowes would stock ?
 
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Old 12-07-12, 03:48 PM
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I recall an earlier post where you mentioned that you thought you might be paying twice for the same water, so I understand the rationale behind your check valve. I was just surprised I guess that it was not a copper supply feed to your house.

Testing products for water glass or drainage pressure testing Test plugs are the 5th item on the attached link page. Basically a balloon at the end of a tube that has a valve like you would find on your auto tire. Fill it to the recommended psi and the balloon expands to shut off the water leak.

No, you do not leave the plug in the line. You insert the plug from the house side, past your desired connection spot. Inflate to cut off the supply of water. With the air hose dangling out of the hole, you slip on a PVC shut off valve and glue the side closest to the meter. Deflate the plug, remove completely, close the new valve and you have a dry connection in which to complete your piping.

I was going to post a picture, but the upload would not take. Been that way for the last 2 days or so since they did the upgrades to the website.
 
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Old 12-07-12, 04:02 PM
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Thanks for the link and explanation, hope I don't have to go that route - it's a little pricey and probably would have to wait until monday to get one at a plumbing supply house

I think I'll wait until morning to turn the water back on, I'd hate for it to come loose while I'm asleep and run all night Sure was a lot bigger job than I expected. Too many roots for the tractor bucket to be effective and then when I did get where I could cut the pipe, my end of the meter jumped up 2" or so from the roots under the meter
 
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Old 12-07-12, 05:11 PM
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Hi, A possible fix. The meter is bronze it has threaded ports for connections. Shut the water off cut the Pvc and remove it from the port on the meter.Iinstall a brass nipple and ball valve to the vacated port and hook the PVC to the end of the new valve.
Good Luck Woodbutcher
 
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Old 12-08-12, 10:24 AM
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I know I have to wait 2 hrs before turning the water back on, do I need to increase that time due to the wet joints?
My understanding is that most PVC cement will dry with a little water in the pipes. The issue is any type of pressure will blow the connections if you don't wait for it to fully cure. So I don't see an issue with it.

I've also heard of "Wet Conditions Blue PVC Cement" that allows a quick cure in wet conditions. I've never used it, but it's supposedly great stuff. Though again, I don't think your conditions are wet enough to require it.
 
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Old 12-08-12, 12:40 PM
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Rain'r Shine will set up on a wet connection. Use it all the time when we have problems that we have to solve and can't get it dry. I wouldn't use a PVC ball valve if you dumped a truck load in my yard for free. I always use brass valves. The guy who developed the PVC valve should have been tarred and feathered.
 
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Old 12-08-12, 01:19 PM
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I wouldn't use a PVC ball valve if you dumped a truck load in my yard for free.
While I generally agree with this sentiment there is an exception. I had to use PVC ball valves in chemical applications but I also specified "true union" valves that had union connections (O ring sealed) on each end. Between exercising the valve on a regular basis and the unions to allow easy replacement when necessary I was able to use the PVC ball valves with little trouble. Of course few people will pay the freight on the true union valves unless absolutely necessary.
 
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Old 12-08-12, 02:37 PM
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I think it's all fixed
I wound up taking a PVC ball valve and a PVC 3/4" pipe fitting and glued it up and let it dry, then screwed it in place so I could turn of the small stream. I didn't know about wet PVC cement, I was using the all purpose cement that's good for both PVC and CPVC....... and had minor drips on a few of the joints. The hardest part was digging out another foot of the water line so I had enough flexibility to hook everything up

What do you have against the PVC ball valves? I have 2 under the house and at least one of them is 20 yrs old. I've never had any issues with them.
 
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Old 12-08-12, 02:47 PM
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Try turning one completely off.......90% won't completely close and those that do close are flukes, IMO. Every time I go to change filters or shut down a house for a repair, I can never use the pvc ball valves. I have to go to the street, or turn off the well and relieve pressure. I am not sure if the plastic has a reaction with water or what, but they seem to bind up when you try to close them. Brass ball valves on the other hand are almost bullet proof.
 
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Old 12-08-12, 02:57 PM
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Maybe I've just been lucky but I've never had any issues with the PVC ball valve not shutting off the water completely. I have one where the water to the house Tees off for the exterior spigots and I use that ball valve fairly frequently throughout the winter.... and that is the one that's 20 yrs old.
 
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Old 12-08-12, 05:15 PM
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You and Furd hit the button.....excersize the valve. Most of the ones I get to work with have been sitting there for 5 years, and due to non-use, they just don't want to cut completely off.
 
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Old 12-09-12, 04:20 AM
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Good to know, thanks!

Not that I want to know too much about plumbing. Of all the things to do around the house plumbing is my least favorite..... and I'm not sure the word favorite even applies
 
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