Shower not draining, toilet is, plus old bathroom stack leaking?

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Old 12-08-12, 10:23 AM
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Shower not draining, toilet is, plus old bathroom stack leaking?

Hi,

We just recently bought a house that was inspected and was given a clean bill of health. However, we just started cleaning the second bathroom and noticed the shower was not draining. the toilet is though.

I went into the basement to look at the stack and saw that it was the old stack it was tied into. We have another stack for another bathroom that works just fine.

I also noticed that there is some moisture around the stack (which is pretty old and seems to be 'slightly' rusted?

Should i be concerned about this moisture and replace the stack? How much does this cost?

Secondly any tips on the shower? I am thinking some draino?

here is the link to the picture:
http://img837.imageshack.us/img837/834/photodrb.jpg

Thanks guys.
 
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Old 12-08-12, 12:43 PM
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Whose inspector? Yours or one suggested by the Real Estate Company? They always will give a good bill of health to facilitate a sale.

Not sure why he couldn't see the moisture. I'd call him back and see what he has to say for missing such a blatant problem. Your shower may have gobs of hair, etc preventing it from draining properly. Have you pulled off the grid cover on the floor? Don't use chemicals to rid a drain of a clog. It only exacerbates problems later on, especially if you are on a septic system.
 
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Old 12-08-12, 01:30 PM
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I consider pour down the drain clog removers a waste of money and have never actually seen one work except in the commercials on TV. Like Chandler mentioned try removing the drain screen. Often hair & debris can be seen a few inches underneath. A clothes hanger wire with a small hook bent in the end and/or needle nose pliers can get much of it. Most home centers also sell a tool just for the task. It's a plastic strip about 18" long with barbs on the sides to hook the hair.





Can you see the source of the leak in your drain stack? If so that would make a repair much more affordable. If it's in an inaccessible area the cost can skyrocket.
 
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Old 12-08-12, 01:46 PM
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I also noticed that there is some moisture around the stack (which is pretty old and seems to be 'slightly' rusted?
Cast iron drains can last a hundred years easily... but they do sometimes crack and/or rust. If you can feel around it, try to figure out if the moisture is coming from a joint or a crack in the stack.

As far as dealing with the inspector, the more reputable ones would be okay with you calling and asking about a problem like this. They likely won't pay for fixing it mind you ("I'm sure it wasn't leaking like that during the inspection"), but he may be willing to give you some suggestions.

The cost to repair (and whether it's a DIY project or not) really depends on whether it's leaking above or below the hub at floor level... and how much you want to get your hands dirty.
 
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Old 12-09-12, 05:42 AM
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Well, we got the shower fixed. Just had to use the plunger for 10 min straight and WHOOOSH.

Now, for the stack... the house had not been in use for a year when our (not the real estate company's) inspector inspected it so I bet he didnt notice.

Should i have this fixed? Is this a big problem?

I think the stack might be original to the house which was built in 1940.
 
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Old 12-09-12, 10:31 AM
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If there is a leak, yes it needs to be fixed. Whether or not it's a big deal depends on where it is leaking. If it's a readily accessible area it's relatively simple. If it's buried in a wall or floor somewhere it will be more involved and expensive. Water is one thing you don't want loose in your house. Leaks only get bigger (they don't fix themselves) and over time the water will only do more damage so any leak tends to be cheaper and easier to fix the earlier you catch it.
 
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