replace section of craked waste stack

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  #1  
Old 12-09-12, 05:31 PM
J
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replace section of craked waste stack

The plumbing contractor is replacing a section of cast iron vertical waste stack in bathroom. It is located between bathroom tiled wall and kitchen masonite sheetrock wall. The exact location of broken pipe can't be seen, so either tiles have to be broken or the wallboard has to be opened.
Which is the better method: Breaking tiles or cutting wallboard ?

Another question: Can only a section of pipe be cut out without the horizontal conections to the bathtub and toilet be broken with the vertical movement of the stack, and the weight of the good stack pipe above which can be several feet.

Can the new cast iron pipe be installed without problems ?

The yellow pages contains ads for sewer pipe work stating: All work guaranteed ! but in small print says: in most cases.

Thanks for comments.
 
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Old 12-09-12, 05:40 PM
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Replacing sheetrock is easy, some patching and painting and you're done. Tile is much harder and usually you want to stay away from that unless you're planning a bathroom remodel.

The cast iron needs to be well supported above and below the cut, and it will be replaced with PVC and two rubber no-hub couplers.

Good plumbers are hard to find (like most trades). Recommend getting at least 2 quotes and try to get references from your neighbors, friends, etc.
 
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Old 12-09-12, 10:25 PM
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Any suggestions on how to support the upper cast iron pipe, so there is no movement after the cut. The plumber doesn't explain anything. They just want to do the job. I'm thinking they're going to break the tub and toilet conections and charge us for additional work.

Would the PVC be strong enough to support the weight of the upper good section of cast iron pipe. Wouldn't cast iron be a better replacement than PVC.

A second plumber wanted to charge for their time to diagnose and see the work involved before giving an estimate.

Thanks for response.
 
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Old 12-09-12, 10:38 PM
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Are you sure its the cast iron? A lot of times the roof flange leaks and drips down the pipoe. Many plumbers scam on this.

But if it is your cast, how many floors?

I am not understanding how toilet and tub come into play...? There is a vent in the wall. They or you will need to do some demolition of a wall to fix. Why break tile when you can open the opposite side wall? If thats what you mean
 
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Old 12-10-12, 06:47 AM
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Would the PVC be strong enough to support the weight of the upper good section of cast iron pipe. Wouldn't cast iron be a better replacement than PVC.
No, the cast iron needs to be well supported during and after the cut. Even if you put a piece of replacement iron pipe, it won't be self-supporting since the new pipe has to be cut a little shorter so it can actually fit in the space.

A second plumber wanted to charge for their time to diagnose and see the work involved before giving an estimate.
Do you feel comfortable cutting into the wall and trying to find the leak yourself? Mike has a good point about the roof flange. If you spend the time doing the inspection, you and the plumber can feel comfortable with the amount of work involved. It's hard to say it will take x hours and cost $y if you're not really sure if the leak is here, there, or on the roof.
 
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Old 12-10-12, 10:27 AM
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The roof flashing on the vent stack is good. The waste stack begins on the 3rd floor and connects to the tub, toilet and sink. If there is any movement of the waste stack during the repair from below, these connections will break and the 2nd floor ceiling would have to be opened up for repairs.

I can't see how the upper pipe can be supported because now the weight of the 3 floors of cast iron is supported at the basement sewer connection. There are no fasteners.

The crack in the cast iron can be located anywhere along 4-5ft inside wall of the 2nd floor.

Thanks for comments.
 
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Old 12-10-12, 01:06 PM
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I forgot to mention. The tenant in the 2nd floor apartment won't allow me to do anything because she wants a licensed contractor. Usually I would do exactly as you say to do my own carpentry and inspection. But the plumber and her agreed to remove the tiles last Friday when I stopped them and told them stop work. The tenant is a sibling who has ownership rights, and told me the other sibling Executrix has legally decided to remove the tiles.
Sorry to tell you this.

They had told me not to interfere with their making repairs, because the Executrix decides.
 
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Old 12-10-12, 01:56 PM
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I would seriously consider moving. Fighting with a sibling, especially one who holds such power over you is no picnic.
 
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