Drinking Water to Detached Garage

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Old 01-03-13, 01:36 PM
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Drinking Water to Detached Garage

Hi,

I'm wanting to have drinking water in my detached garage, which currently has no plumbing (that I'm aware of). If a water supply to a detached structure is deemed drinkable, would I be required to also have drainage system in place? I'm on city water supply and sewer... City has adopted 2009 International Plumbing Code.

I have no need or plans for having showers, toilets... just drinking water... but if that's going to force me to also put in drain lines, I may have to reconsider. Note that the house and detached garage are existing structures.

Thanks!

Nic
 
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Old 01-03-13, 01:40 PM
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If you are going to run the pipe work properly to have water in your garage, I'd think you would want drainage as well. Not sure if there would a code requirement here (but possible).

What about a simple solution of using a garden hose (or similar) to supply water to the garage?
This would be a quick and easy solution.
 
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Old 01-03-13, 01:41 PM
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If you just want drinking water, why do all that work? What's wrong with those 5 gallon water coolers? They also have hot water for coffee & tea.
 
  #4  
Old 01-03-13, 01:48 PM
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I've had a water cooler in my garage/shop for years. I think the cooler cost less than $100 at the time.
 
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Old 01-03-13, 01:48 PM
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Why not save a ton of money and get one of these??? No electric...... I had one for years....


 
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Old 01-03-13, 01:58 PM
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I was thinking the hose it should already be filtered and drinkable, but can be used for other things (i.e wetting a rag, or washing the car).

Once you have water in the garage, you'll have tons of uses for it.
 
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Old 01-03-13, 02:02 PM
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Ok, I guess I'll spill all the details. The reason I need drinking water is for beer brewing. Don't worry, I already have the neccesary license for that, but will be doing batches requiring anywhere from 7 to probalby 15ish gallons of water. I suppose I could settle for buying the water in containers and moving them...I was just wanting to have to minimize the lifting. Plus if I already had running potable water in the garage, I could have a sprayer connected for cleanup as well... and just let it run down the driveway.

The ULTIMATE goal (maybe a couple of years from now) is to build a dedicated brewing building (basically a fancy shed on skids, on a concrete slab... and just have a floor drain to spill out into the yard since I wouldn't have any human waste going down the drain.

I assumed I could run a water line for the purpose of garden hoses (not sure of the technical plumbing term) but I don't think that'd be legally classified as potable water.

May just have to go down to the city building services office and ask them what the requirement is. I don't know if every city in the country is this complicated but It seems like to get a permit for anything I have to have a massive packet of paperwork filled out inculding a complete site layout/plan and tons of other stuff.
 
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Old 01-03-13, 02:11 PM
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Gotta be careful with hoses, a lot of them are not compatible with drinking water.
 
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Old 01-03-13, 02:22 PM
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Don't worry, I already have the neccesary license for that,
License??? You need a license......

I better run out to my garage and dump the all my hooch....


Anyway let me take a look at the code. Your probably limited to running a line out there for a hose bib, since your not installing a sink and such.


 
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Old 01-03-13, 02:30 PM
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License??? You need a license......
I better run out to my garage and dump the all my hooch....
Anyway let me take a look at the code. Your probably limited to running a line out there for a hose bib, since your not installing a sink and such.
Hahh... yes, license is required but I've renewed 3 years in a row and I've yet to be asked to produce my license by any agents.

Anyway, I might still have a sink but would run a visible drain pipe to the driveway. Unless of course I were required to have drains connected to my main sewer line. And as Mitch17 said, I don't think I want to use the garden hose to supply all the drinking water.

In the past I did the neccesary cleaning in the kitchen, which had a door right to the garage, and I did my brewing in the driveway or just inside the garage door opening. But that was the old residence... my new residence (which is MUCH older, despite the word "new") has only a detached garage and is a good 60 foot walk down 6 or 7 steps steps and a sidewalk from the kitchen in the a actual house.
 
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Old 01-03-13, 02:52 PM
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I too would be careful about using a garden hose for potable water.

If I were homebrewing I would get a permit for a hose bib attached to my garage and use a temporary hose suitable for potable water.

I have a stainless sink in my garage - no drain just a 5 gallon bucket.
 
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Old 01-03-13, 03:08 PM
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You can safely use water hose if you use a camper water hose. I use them for camper and no rubber taste. It is lined with PVC and safe for drinking
 
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Old 01-03-13, 04:24 PM
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Since I live in a climate that generally goes below freezing in the winter (some days the highs are below freezing) and my building will not be heated, I assume I'd need a hose bib where the valve is below the frost line as well. I could use a hydrant in the yard but a typical one would not be sanitary... does anyone have anything to say about these:
FreezeFlow: Freeze Flow Sanitary Yard Hydrants are frost free and fully self-contained.

I'm sure there are others on the market but this was the first I saw. I'd probably want to keep it capped off as well when not in use... but this would allow for both sanitary use (drinking water or brewing water) as well as non sanitary use, like washing the car. Accurate statement or not?

I'm not breaking ground tomorrow or anything but am trying to get the planning process going as I do plan to also start an electrical upgrade to the same garage (underground electrical feed) and whether or not I have to dig separate trenches for water and electrical (and drain, if required), I'd like to do all the digging at the same time and even better if I can use the same trench, but that's an entirely separate discussion.
 
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Old 01-03-13, 06:00 PM
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You need to make sure you buy a potable water hose like those made for campers. Regular garden hoses have lead in them and that makes them unsuitable for drinking.
 
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Old 01-03-13, 06:13 PM
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I could have a sprayer connected for cleanup as well... and just let it run down the driveway.


A whole neighborhood full of drunken dogs and cats and squirrels!
 
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Old 01-03-13, 06:51 PM
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I picked out what I could from the code book.


701.2 Sewer required.


Every building in which plumbing fixtures are installed and all premises having drainage piping shall be connected to a public sewer, where available, or an approved private sewage disposal system in accordance with the International Private Sewage Disposal Code.

424.6 Hose-connected outlets.

Faucets and fixture fittings with hose-connected outlets shall conform to ASME A112.18.3M or CSA B125.


602.2 Potable water required.

Only potable water shall be supplied to plumbing fixtures that provide water for drinking, bathing or culinary purposes, or for the processing of food, medical or pharmaceutical products. Unless otherwise provided in this code, potable water shall be supplied to all plumbing fixtures.



423.1 Water connections.

Baptisteries, ornamental and lily pools, aquariums, ornamental fountain basins, swimming pools, and similar constructions, where provided with water supplies, shall be protected against backflow in accordance with
Section 608.

608.15.4.2 Hose connections.

Sillcocks, hose bibbs, wall hydrants and other openings with a hose connection shall be protected by an atmospheric-type or pressure-type vacuum breaker or a permanently attached hose connection vacuum breaker.



SECTION 801 GENERAL

801.1 Scope.


This chapter shall govern matters concerning indirect waste piping and special wastes. This chapter shall further control matters concerning food-handling establishments, sterilizers, clear-water wastes, swimming pools, methods of providing air breaks or air gaps, and neutralizing devices for corrosive wastes.

801.2 Protection.


All devices, appurtenances, appliances and apparatus intended to serve some special function, such as sterilization, distillation, processing, cooling, or storage of ice or foods, and that discharge to the drainage system, shall be provided with protection against backflow, flooding, fouling, contamination and stoppage of the drain.


 
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Old 01-04-13, 09:53 AM
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So it sounds like, unless my AHJ or inspector has exceptions for some reason, that if I have running water to the garage and/or plumbing fixtures, then it must be potable, and must install drains that ultimately connect to my sewer dischage.

So I did a little research using the City's GIS tools and attached some marked up maps. Corner lot. Property generally slopes down from west to east. I had eyeballed the height of the foundation above grade at west and east side and measured the distance to come to an approximation of .29" per foot drop as the rough general slope of the land.

Water main is north of property, Sewer Main is east of property on the other side of the alley. So I guess my house's main sewer line (sorry, not up to par on all the plumbing technical jargon) already has to go towards the garage anyway...at least towards the east. the question is exactly where. So depending on where, it might not be that big of a deal to have a drain added to the garage and properly connect. I guess I need to do some investigating of where the line runs. Any tips on that?

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Thanks!

Nic
 
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Old 01-05-13, 08:34 PM
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Often the water is run next to the sewer.

In the pic where is the meter in the home? I would think the sewer runs up east/west st???
 
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Old 01-05-13, 09:38 PM
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Great question....I've only lived here 3 months... and I have no idea where the water meter is. City is doing a massive meter replacement project though, expected to be done in August so if I hadn't already found it by then it will probably become very obvious.

I went back and looked at the map, zooming out a little... next closest sewer main is another block to the West, so I doubt mine runs that far... pretty sure it goes to the alley on the east side. BUT there is another water main runing North/South. Again the Blue is water main, pink dashed is sewer, and this time my property outlined in orange. They are not exactly right on the location...I looked in the alley yesterday and could see where the pavement had been redone after maintenance/replacement of the main, running right up to a sewer access hole in the street, and so I think the sewer main actually is under the alley instead of going under the garage of my neighbor to the east as the map indicates, so the lines could easily be off by 8 feet in any direction. So as for teh water mains, who knows which side of the street they're on (or if they're dead center) but it looks like a main runs along both streets adjacent to my property so I suppose it could be either one.

I'll go search for the water meter when the sun is out and temp is up a little.

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Old 01-05-13, 09:46 PM
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Pretty easy. You on a slab, basement, crawl?
 
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Old 01-05-13, 09:47 PM
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OOps. Blue lines didn't show up well... let me try this again:Name:  watersewer.jpg
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Old 01-06-13, 06:25 AM
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You could always call 811, call before you dig. They will locate your water main (and gas main). I'm not sure if they usually locate sewer lines too, but if you're there when the guy shows up, he may be able to help/
 
 

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