Change A T-Connection in a Natural Gas Line

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Old 03-31-13, 07:26 PM
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Change A T-Connection in a Natural Gas Line

My question is how, or if, you can change just an existing T-connection in an existing natural gas line. Ok, so here's the story. I'm getting a tankless water heater put in, and the existing gas line that is 1/2" needs to be changed to 3/4". Here is a run of how my pipes go. The meter line goes into the laundry room off of the carport. It is 1" here. The 1" travels the 6 or so feet up the wall and into the attic. It then runs horizontal at 1" for about another 5-6 feet. At this point there is a 1"-1/2"-1" T-connection. The 1/2" out is the beginning of where the line needs to be changed. From the T, the 1/2" pipe runs about 3 feet above the ceiling of the laundry room area, and then drops vertical to where the old hot water heater is and where the new tankless will be hanging on the wall. Right after the T-connector, there is about a 1" nipple and then another T-connector that is 1"-1/2"-1/2" I believe (it is a little hard to see). The 1/2" branch out goes down the wall and connects to the gas dryer that is in the laundry area (obviously). The straight branch continues on through the house for a longer stretch into the kitchen down to where a gas stove is (well it actually isn't connected at the moment). Now, before I get the lecture about how I'm going to blow myself up and all, I have the permit, an actual plumber will be doing the actual work, the gas has been off for a couple weeks, and the lines have been bled. There's no gas in the pipes or gas smell. Can this be as simple as changing out that 1"-1/2"-1" T to a 1"-3/4"-1" T, and how would a plumber do that? I want to be as informed as possible. All your help would be appreciated. Thanks.
 
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Old 03-31-13, 07:43 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

It sounds like you wont have any gas fumes to worry about.

Working with iron pipe can be a bit of a challenge. You can't just "change out" an existing T.
When working with pipe you start at one end.....usually the gas meter and work out to the stubs. So in order to change a T in the middle of the system you either need to work back words to that point or cut existing lines and install unions to reconnect the lines.
 
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Old 04-01-13, 07:33 AM
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Dont know if the 3/4 is even good. Really need more info...

How many btu's is the tankless?
How many total btu,s of all appliances? ( Any that will be hooked up eventually)
What is the distance of the farthust appliance from the meter?

Additionally to save the head ache, Just run a dedicated line the proper size from the meter to the tankless....Done.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 05:59 PM
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It is a smaller tankless at 6.8 gpm at a 35 degree rise and 150,000 BTU max. There's a gas dryer and stove on the line. There used to be a gas furnace, too, but that's long gone. The farthest appliance from the meter is the stove at only about 25 feet. The recommended gas line is 3/4" according to the guidelines for the tankless. I don't believe it will require any more than that for my scenario. I'm curious what you mean by a dedicated line from the meter to the tankless? Meters typically have only one out, right? Or, do you mean have it be the first T off the line? If that is what you meant, that will indeed be the case. If there is another way to look at it, I'd like to know. Maybe it'll save me some hassle.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 06:02 PM
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I thought that was the case. I just wanted to know for sure so I was prepared with what it might be for labor for the plumber.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 08:00 PM
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Yes as soon as the meter line elbows to go into the home, that is where you add a tee. Then you pipe from that tee to the tankless.

Dont know how far the tankless is from the meter and do not have my gas chart on me. That will determine pipe size.


Now if you wanted to tap off where you said, the reason you cant is that pipe may not have enough BTU/s...

Stove say 100k btu
dryer say 22k btu.
Furnace say 100K btu.. ( How are you heating the home with no furnace?)

So 222k btu. Say thats what your layout supports... Now minus the furnace = 122k btu.

Add the tankless 150k + 122K = 272k btu. You see you are over what the original piping capacity may have been at 222k btu.

The above is just an example to show you what I mean... Piping from the meter takes all the figuring out, and you can just run a home run. Piping from where you wanted may require to re-pipe most of what you have there already... Wasted labor IMO.
 
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