New old house drain

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Old 03-31-13, 11:31 PM
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New old house drain

We pursched a older home 8months ago and there has always been water in the craw space. I knew this moving in and was going to get a pump put in. My house is from 1918 and has a very low clearance. I was finally able to look at the plumping on the far end of the house under the laundry room. I found that my kitchen and washing machine drain is not hooked to anything. I know that they all come together and drains to my septic, well are suppose to. They are both hooked to the same drain line but shortly after that it just comes to a end and onto the ground. A new septic was put in 2 yrs ago and I'm assuming they never went under the house and just hooked to the old main line. I also think my bathroom drain its the ground. I just can't get back far enough to see. So my main issues are.

Since I have such low clearance and even getting to that end is difficult should I just hire someone to fix this?

And has anyone had experience with purchasing a home and finding issues later on that you were not aware of. we got an inspection, but he was unable to crawl that far. we looked over the complete disclosure that the previous owners filled out and there is a section that clearly asks if all the drain pipes go to the sewer and they marked yes. Do they hold any accountability?
 
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Old 04-01-13, 12:53 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

In your opening statement you said the kitchen and laundry room were not connected or plumbed to the septic system.

In your closing sentence you said sewer.
Sewer or septic ??

If the previous owners had that plumbing work done or knew about.......it would become a failure to disclose issue.

If they were only there a short time and had no idea about the situation.... I would think failure to disclose would be extremely difficult to prove.

I would think that you should check with your real estate agent for advice. You will probably end up having to check the town hall for plumbing permits to see what was done and when.
 
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Old 04-01-13, 05:05 AM
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I'll avoid the legal issues and just talk plumbing. Often with older houses kitchen sinks and washing machines were never connected to the septic system. They had a separate drain line that just ran somewhere outside and discharged onto the ground. Occasionally the outlets get overgrown or covered and forgotten. It is odd that those pipes are not connected to anything but with older homes you never know what to expect since most were built before the existence of codes so much was just left to the builders.

Whether or not you fix this or hire a professional is up to you. I've run into similar situations before and it is rarely an easy fix. Not complicated or technically difficult but because access is difficult it can take a lot of work & time which equals money.

One option is to dig a trench back to the problem area. It's a lot of manual work in a tight space but it creates an access path for the future. Most commonly though I cut holes in the floor and work from there. The plumbing work can progress much more quickly but it introduces a mess into the house and then once the original work is done it's another full job to repair the floors.
 
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Old 04-01-13, 05:56 AM
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Sorry let me clear it up, i wrote this kinda late.

I can see that my laundry room and kitchen are both connected to the same pipe, but after they join together it stops. Im unable to see the bathroom and when running the water I dont see anything coming out of the pipe where the laundry and kitchen meet, but i can hear it hitting water just not sure if its the pipe or ground water. Here is a picture of what it looks like when the laundry and kitchen sink is draining.

And the previous owners lived here for ten years. When we first looked at the house they didnt have a washer but did have a dryer. I thought this was kinda wired so i asked why they didnt have one and they said they had no money. I got all this in an email so for them not to know this was happening after living here for 10yrs is hard for me to believe.
 
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Old 04-01-13, 06:20 AM
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Well at least you are able to get back there. That will make repairing it much easier and less expensive.

I have to think this is somewhat recent since the beam and floor joist seem to be getting wet. If it had been going on for 10 years they certainly would be rotten and at least show definite water staining.


If you decide to do it yourself I would break down and buy a sheet of 1/2" thick rigid foam insulation or something similar. Cut it lengthwise into the widest strips you can fit into the crawl space. Drag them back to the area and use it to cover the muddy, wet ground. It will keep you cleaner, dryer and warmer and will allow you to slide & move around much more easily. It's amazing how being out of the water & mud will improve your attitude when working.
 
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