Device to pull larger pipe replacing a smaller one?

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Old 06-08-13, 08:40 PM
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Device to pull larger pipe replacing a smaller one?

I realized today that I have a water supply pipe leaking outside. About 20 ft. from the house I have a lawn spigot where I can hear the leak and a few feet down the hill from this spigot the hill is sopping wet.

So, once I dig up the leak, I would like to replace the pipe from the lawn spigot to the house, which I assume is 3/4" copper because that is what enters the house, with 1" something.

If I should use pex, is there a way I can just pull the new larger pex pipe through the existing hole as I pull the old one out so I don't have to dig up my veggie garden it passes under?
 
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Old 06-08-13, 09:11 PM
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Makes no since to me.
If the new pipe is bigger how do you expect to pull it through a smaller hole?
 
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Old 06-08-13, 09:52 PM
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Electricians use a foam plug and vacuum to feed their fish tape through longer conduit runs. Suppose I feed a cable through the old pipe in a similar way. The cable has a head on it that will push the old pipe out, and a taper to expand the tunnel that additional 1/4", and an attachment for the new pex to pull it in right behind. Of course, it will depend on how compacted the ground is, interference with gravel and how stout the cable is, but the idea seems simple enough. That's why I'm askin' folks that might know better.
 
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Old 06-08-13, 10:22 PM
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They make a system that uses a cable. The system does work as you describe it. Wait for Lawrosa..... the plumbing pro..... to stop by. He has pictures from when he did his.
 
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Old 06-09-13, 04:37 AM
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Check you local tool rental stores to see if they have the puller available to rent. A half day rental could make quick work of it.
 
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Old 06-09-13, 05:05 AM
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He has pictures from when he did his.
Are you talking about the one where he is getting sprayed with water from the broken line? That was a hoot. I would think it should be possible with a good puller and "head" to clear the way.
 
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Old 06-09-13, 09:34 AM
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I would like to replace the pipe from the lawn spigot to the house, which I assume is 3/4" copper because that is what enters the house, with 1" something.
Best off using poly pipe IMO.

If I should use pex, is there a way I can just pull the new larger pex pipe through the existing hole as I pull the old one out so I don't have to dig up my veggie garden it passes under?
Yes. You cut the pipe in the home where the sevice enters. Cut a hole in the floor or foundation big enough that a pipe slitter will fit.

Dig a hole out at the curb key if you have one. Or meter pit if you have one. ( big enough to work in.)

Then you send a cable through from the home to the open hole. The slitter will be on the home side.

Attach a piece of pipe to the slitter in the home side.

Then hook the cable to a truck tow hook and slowly pull. The slitter will slit the copper, or pull it out in one piece, and the poly pipe will follow. When the pipe comes out the end stop.

Connect municipal side and flush line. Then connect home side. Done...


Here is an example. I will try to fine the tool to but but its like 500-600 bucks.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PqcmB1hW4QY
IMO if you have copper and are able to gig the repair up you will just need to cut and solder a new piece of pipe.

Although I believe most codes say a flare or ford fitting is needed. Some water companys are using sharkbites from what I know, but they are not standard home store varity....

Let us know... Take a few pics.


Oh here is the nightmare I had when I nicked the curb key with the Kubota..


Water Service Slideshow by lawrosa | Photobucket
 
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Old 06-09-13, 11:10 AM
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Except for the "slitter" part, that's exactly what I was thinking. If it's available by rental I should be set.

Is the purpose of the slitter feature to shrink the size of the pipe so it is easier to pull or is there something more? I assume I can use my Explorer and trailer hitch to pull my 20 ft. of pipe. What is the longest typical run this tool might be used on?
 
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Old 06-09-13, 02:22 PM
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I used on 100 ft plus.

The slitter splits the old pipe while pulling and the new pipe follows behind...
 
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Old 06-09-13, 08:05 PM
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It turns out the leak isn't in the line, but the seals in the hydrant. While I still had to dig down to the drain hole in the hydrant to identify it, I didn't find what I thought I would so I don't think I will be replacing the pipe after all. Still, I hate to waste a perfectly good hole...

The hydrant is on a side branch, 1" copper, from the incoming line. I can't yet see the main line (at least a foot away, still under gravel somewhere), but I take this to mean the main is also 1" to at least this point. I am left to speculate where the reduction to 3/4" occurs before entering the house.

Had the leak been in the pipe, I might have used the repair as an excuse to replace the whole section. But that would have only been in anticipation of a much larger project. The meter is probably 400 feet away from the house, with an intermediate stop at a former mobile home site. With pressure drops when using multiple fixtures, I figure the long distance is the cause and am considering replacing the whole length with larger size. The 3/4" entry made me suspicious of what they might have used originally.
 
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