Time to replace copper pipe?

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Old 07-30-13, 12:13 PM
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Time to replace copper pipe?

My house was made in 1960.

I've gone and started finishing my basement and I have noticed that some of my copper pipe is starting to get a line of speckling green spots. Is it time to replace it? There are also some iron pipes that go down to the basement and they are extremely heavy. Should those be replaced as well?
 
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Old 07-30-13, 05:14 PM
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Some well installations have a great deal of sand in them, and this sand can erode copper from the inside. All of a sudden, one day, you have 5 leaks and the copper pipe is crushable. Not a good situation. If you have the energy and want to take this on, I would definitely go with Pex, replacing all the copper.
 
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Old 07-30-13, 07:32 PM
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The green spots are likely from condensation forming on the pipe when cold water is run through it.

It is likely nothing to worry about but ask your neighbors if they have even had any issues like Chandler described.
 
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Old 07-31-13, 05:33 AM
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I'm with Tolyn Ironhand regarding the green spots if you are seeing them on the outside of the pipe.
Might be an indicator to consider a dehumidifier in the basement.

If you have a good reason to replace, PEX is the way to go. If you recycle your copper, you can probably recover a bit of the cost of your new installation.

I'm going to be replacing my copper in my 1930's home. Doing this because some of the lines are too small, a number of gate valves are seized, and the retrofits over the years has the piping running all over the place. If I didn't have to replace the valves, I could almost break even on materials by recycling my old pipe.
 
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Old 07-31-13, 05:53 AM
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Yes, there was a humidity problem in the basement, since resolved with french drains, vapor barrier, and a dehumidifier. What I find odd though is that this is in only one specific area and the rest of the pipe is intact.
 
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Old 07-31-13, 06:23 AM
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Yes, there was a humidity problem in the basement, since resolved with french drains, vapor barrier, and a dehumidifier. What I find odd though is that this is in only one specific area and the rest of the pipe is intact.
Could this one section of pipe be lower then the rest (water does travel down) or be near a previously troubled area?
 
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Old 07-31-13, 06:34 AM
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No, it's about the same. It's not really in a trouble area.
 
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