Adding Tee to copper (3") grey water line

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Old 08-02-13, 05:37 AM
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Adding Tee to copper (3") grey water line

Was back over at a co-worker's place, helping them plan out the rough in for a laundry room (will start working tonight).
Domestic water was easy to locate and will be fairly straight forward to tie into and run to the washing machine. The drain... a bit different.
The first thing I noticed was the pipe looked to be old cast (1910's home) with similar clamps to those found on victolic pipes. A previous owner had painted the pipes with a silver paint. Scratching some paint off where we'll be cutting in, it turned out the be 3" copper

Hit up the big orange store to pick up the other supplies and see what I could see for this discharge issue. The sales guy at HD looked at me funny when I said it was 3" copper (apparently I had the same look on my face when I discovered this was copper).

Anyway, the sales guy had the same suggestion as I was thinking to tie into it. Being that 3" copper wasn't available, would cost more then a morgage payment, and how the heck do you solder this..., he suggested an ABS angled tee, using flexable couplers, the same idea as going from cast to ABS (see picture below).


Any thoughts about this?
I'm not particularly comfy with the couplers, but have never used them and it's not a high pressure line.
 
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Old 08-02-13, 06:09 AM
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Our home is plumbed all in copper, which I thought was great until we discovered a leak in one of the straight runs of a waste line this spring. So I patched it for the time being, and will replace it with pvc this fall. Anyway, I talked with a plumber buddy, and ones like you mentioned are what he suggested. The only thing that he told me though was to get them from a plumbing supply, rather than the hardware or big box, because there are ones available, sized specifically for that application. I asked about any emergency repairs that might come up, and he said that a standard one would work.
 
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Old 08-02-13, 06:24 AM
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Thanks for the confirmation.
I googled it on the drive to the store (wasn't driving) and found that although it didn't pop up too frequently, it was still common enough to show up on google in a few spots.
Most of the grey water lines I've dealt with have been cast, abs or pvc (mostly abs). I don't do home renos as a profession, so I'm sure there are other materials used.

From what I have read and seen, the flexable couplers are the way to go in a lot of cases. It just doesn't seam perminent to me.
 
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Old 08-02-13, 09:51 AM
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Fernco has a lot of couplers, some can even be buried underground.

Fernco | Global Leaders in Flexible Couplings, Drainage & Plumbing Systems test
 
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Old 08-02-13, 10:09 AM
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Thanks Baldwin.
This tie-in is above the concrete, and at an easy to access point.
Your link pretty much confirms that I have taken the right direction with this which was the point of the thread. Now I just have to get over the fact they use these for perminent home plumbing, and not just for air lines on cars (intercooler couplers).
 
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