Leaky toilet?

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Old 08-10-13, 09:30 AM
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Question Leaky toilet?

I own half of a duplex in a small condo community. There is an upstairs bathroom, and directly underneath is a half bath.
For some reason, there is an overhang of about 6 inches outside, with the second floor "hanging over" the first floor. It runs the entire length of the house.
We have a ceiling leak in the downstairs bath RIGHT where the eave is. I am attaching a picture. This is right at the eave line. The condo association is responsible for all external stuff, siding, leaks, etc.
The toilets are right in line with each other, and they're about a foot away from where this leak is showing.
The condo association wants me to get a plumber in to assess the upstairs toilet, claiming the leak is from a bad seal, and not coming in from the outside. This is quite typical of them, to try to get the owner to foot the bill.
Does this look to you like a roof leak, or a toilet leak?
We've got no signs of water leakage in the upstairs bathroom. NO soft floor, no wet floor, nothing.
To me it looks fairly evident that this is outside leakage, but I wanted to see what others thought. Thanks in advance!
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Old 08-10-13, 10:09 AM
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Welcome to the forums! It would pay you to just remove the sheetrock in the corner out to the next joist so you can see what is happening. No need to pull in an expensive plumber right now. Once the sheetrock is removed you can explore to see if it is a pressure leak (possible with exterior wall) or a drain/wax seal leak. Let us know what you find.
 
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Old 08-10-13, 10:19 AM
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Thank you, Larry. I was reading about how simple it is to cut out the sheetrock, but I'm frightened. Hee! I guess no matter what it needs to be replaced, right? Thanks for the advice. I will let you know.
 
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Old 08-10-13, 10:38 AM
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...We've got no signs of water leakage in the upstairs bathroom. NO soft floor, no wet floor, nothing...
Bobbi Iím just a newbie but I donít think you would necessarily see a wet floor upstairs if the toilet seal was leaking. Especially if there is caulking around the base of the toilet and the floor. (I didnít know this till recently, but I believe plumbing code requires caulking around the base of the toilet and floor.)

I had a toilet seal leak and only knew about it because I did not have caulking around the base of the toilet and so the floor was getting wet. Went down the basement and sure enough I could see the floor under the toilet had been getting wet for a while.

(I lived in a condo for 25 years and I know what you mean about associations.)
 
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Old 08-10-13, 10:47 AM
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Might be wise to check the vent boot that seals the vent pipe as it exits the roof prior to popping holes in the ceiling. It is a common reason for leaks showing up on the ceilings adjacent to bathrooms. If it is the boot, then the association should take care of it as it is on the exterior of the building.
 
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Old 08-10-13, 10:58 AM
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My sister also lived in a condo and was getting wet spots on her ceiling. I traced it up to the attic and found the insulation wet right under where the vent pipe passed through the roof. But for other reasons we never got passed that point.
 
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Old 08-10-13, 11:09 AM
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Thank you all for the input. I just think the way it's right up against the wall, right where that silly "hangover" thing is just looked like it was coming in from outside. I will post a picture of the outside and circle the area where the leak is from the outside. The "hangover" (eave?) (I don't know what to call it!) is vented. There are little holes in it.
I want to learn to be more of a handi-person and less reliant on others for help with jobs I could probably tackle myself. At least in the assessment phase!
 
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Old 08-11-13, 05:35 AM
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If you can access the attic crawl space, you can go to where the vent pipe is and look from below. If the boot is damaged you will be able to see daylight around the vent pipe. It usually is dark up there so any light bleed around the vent will point to that being the water source.
 
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