Removing bathroom sink drain plug with glued abs p-trap ?

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-05-13, 01:30 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Canada
Posts: 25
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Removing bathroom sink drain plug with glued abs p-trap ?

Hello,

I'm currently trying to remove the drain plug on a bathroom sink. The only problem is that the p-trap is glued and I'm not able to remove the drain body/tail piece.

Is there a way to remove the drain body/tail piece without cutting the abs pipe ?

Any recommendations would be highly appreciated.

See photo below

Name:  IMG_1265.jpg
Views: 25048
Size:  14.7 KB
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-05-13, 02:11 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,175
Received 254 Votes on 228 Posts
Are you sure its glued? The photo shows typical slip nuts. I don't know why a sink trap would ever be glued. If it is then cutting seems to be your only alternative. But their cheap to replace.
 
  #3  
Old 09-05-13, 02:45 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Canada
Posts: 25
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes, the p-trap is glued. The slip nut you see on the vertical pipe is simply to lock the drain body (tail). The tail of the drain body is inserted about 3" into the vertical pipe. I would need to remove the p-trap to remove the drain body.
 
  #4  
Old 09-05-13, 02:51 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,175
Received 254 Votes on 228 Posts
Well, in that case this is the perfect time to cut out the whole mess and do it right. Then next time you need to work on it, it will be much easier.

Why do you need to do anything at all?. This looks like a new and clean install. If its a clog your trying to fix then use the drain plug at the bottom of the trap.
 

Last edited by Norm201; 09-05-13 at 02:53 PM. Reason: a thought
  #5  
Old 09-05-13, 02:58 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Canada
Posts: 25
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'm changing the faucet and need to install a new drain plug for the faucet.
 
  #6  
Old 09-05-13, 03:04 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,175
Received 254 Votes on 228 Posts
I see. Then you're back to square one. Cut and replace and do it the correct way. This situation is one of my pet peeves. Professionals doing things to prevent proper maintenance.
 
  #7  
Old 09-05-13, 04:46 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Canada
Posts: 25
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Norm201Just to save few bucks they didn't install slip nuts. I still can't figure out how the plumber was able to install the drain body with a slip nut on the p-trap.
 
  #8  
Old 09-06-13, 06:11 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,175
Received 254 Votes on 228 Posts
In this case I doubt it was to save money. Most likely to save time or maybe pre assembled?

Allow me to hi-jack this thread for just a moment. I've seen this type of thing many times. For instance, for the past 40 years or so on new build homes rooms (except perhaps for kitchens) will no longer have ceiling lights but instead the first outlet will be switched to plug in a free standing lamp. What is the cost to add a ceiling light to room? Come on, not much. But, multiply that by 50 to 200 home trac being build and it adds up. I've had to add ceiling lights in each bed room and re-wire the switch and outlet accordingly. It's a pain. Same thing with isolation valves on sinks. New builds will not have them. Again the cost per house is minimal but add that up on a 200 trac build and labor and material cost become significant. That's why I advise customers (I'm an associate at a local home improvement store) that when doing first time sink and faucet repair to spend the extra time and money now and add threaded (not solder) isolation valves and use braided (not compression tubing) supply tubes. Any future repair like a simple washer replacement on a Sunday evening will prevent from turning off the water supply in the whole house.

OK, now back to you regularly scheduled programing.

Keep up posted on you progress and how you solve your problem.

BTW... if you're not aware, when hooking up a new traps and drains they must be aligned straight and plumb, then hand tighten is all that is necessary to prevent leaking. Good luck.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: