Replace Toilet How Difficult?

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Old 09-07-13, 07:51 AM
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Replace Toilet How Difficult?

I need to replace two toilets, considering tackling this myself but I've never done it. How involved and difficult is this? Thanks.
 
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Old 09-07-13, 07:59 AM
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Unless this is an old house or has numerous plumbing issues, it's one of the simplest jobs you can do. As long as your back is in good shape. Of course even in newer homes you can have issues with shutoff valves not working, bent or cracked flanges, etc.
 
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Old 09-07-13, 08:03 AM
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It's a 101 job. A wrench and a pair of channel locks is all that's needed.
When I change out a toilet I almost always replace the old shut off valve and install a new braided stainless steel supply line.
If you happen to own a shop vac use it to remove the last bit of water in the tank and bowl after removing the dust filter in the vac.
If not an old towel or sponge will do it.
 
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Old 09-07-13, 08:13 AM
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As others have said, its easy. A couple words of caution. When bolting down the new toilet (of course you're getting a new wax ring) don't over tighten the bolts too much and deform or break the flange. Make them firm. Wait about a day and check and maybe tighten about a quarter turn or so if need be. The other thing, don't caulk around the base of the toilet. If if leaks, you want to know it.
 
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Old 09-07-13, 10:03 AM
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Norm201-

...The other thing, don't caulk around the base of the toilet. If if leaks, you want to know it...
Norm I used to agree with you 100% and I used to give people the exact same advice for the same reason – you want to know if it leaks. But then I was told (maybe even on this forum) – that Plumbing Code says that it is in fact required to caulk around the base of a toilet.

Mine is still uncaulked and that did in fact help me determine that there was a leak, and thus I saved my floor from damage.

I did a search when I first heard about this and it seems that many plumbers caulk around the base, but leave an opening in the back so that a leak will be detected if one occurs. So I guess they are 90% code compliant? lol

Seems murky to me, seems like the plumbers don’t actually think that code requirement is a great idea?
 
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Old 09-07-13, 12:41 PM
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I don't know why caulking would be a code thing. But at my place of employment (associate at home improvement store) we must take courses in all the areas of home improvement, one of which is advance plumbing. It was made very clear that we were to advise customers not to caulk the base and if they did to leave the back section open as you stated.

I did a quick Google search and you're correct that it seems that its code, but still I have not seen the code reference as yet. It seems that sanitary reasons are the driving force for the caulking. Especially in hospitals. And I can understand that. But...

I'm curious can you site the code that says caulk is necessary? Even if it applies to only one State, county or town.
 
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Old 09-07-13, 05:35 PM
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Ahh! Good question Norm.

I found this reference on another forum but I don't know whether it is correct. In fact I don't even know what "IRC" stands for:

IRC, 2705.1; UPC 407.2

I guess UPC means Uniform Plumbing Code?

But I have a 2006 "International Plumbing Code" book which contains the following paragraph:

405.5 Water tight Joints. Joints formed where fixtures come in contact with walls or floors shall be sealed.

But I don't know what the relationship is between the UPC the IRC and the IPC?
Maybe that paragraph in the UPC (UPC 407.2) reads like the one above from the IPC (IPC 405.5) ? Maybe most jurisdictions use the UPC?


I agree with you about the hospital thing. But it seems to me you lose much more than you gain by caulking in other cases. It is very confusing to me, especially when people are being trained (as in your case) to "not caulk", which seems to make more sense.

I'm personally leaving mine uncaulked because it gave me an indication that I had a leak.

p.s. I just found another reference (from 2000 code ?) and another paragraph number:

Uniform Plumbing Code requires a watertight seal. (408.2 2000 UPC) "Where a fixture comes into contact with the wall or floor, the joint between the fixture and the wall or floor shall be made watertight."


Holy moly! What's a guy to do?

( I guess you have to buy the latest UPC and look somewhere around section 407-408 ? Not me. Let them put me in jail. lol)
 

Last edited by zoesdad; 09-07-13 at 06:04 PM.
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Old 09-09-13, 04:58 AM
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zoesdad ,

I agree with you. But I'm no longer advising my customers to not caulk.
 
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