Plumber cut exterior concrete block support wall for 2 1/2 drain pipe.

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Old 10-19-13, 05:44 PM
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Plumber cut exterior concrete block support wall for 2 1/2 drain pipe.

Hi, I know nothing about plumbing or concrete block construction. I am doing a low cost remodel and am new to florida. I don't know if I can trust this plumber's advice that the section of concrete block that he cut will not impact the structure.
He was going to cut into the concrete slab, but at the last minute, he cut through the wall. I'm concerned that it has impacted the soundness of the structure. No rebar was in what he cut and the blocks he cut through were hollow. Any imput would be greatly appreciated. Please, see the pictures
 
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Old 10-19-13, 05:54 PM
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This guy needs to go now.
What's he expect, that foam to hold up the house?
 
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Old 10-19-13, 06:29 PM
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I would far rather have a bump out to house all the plumbing to having my wall jeopardized as he has done. He needs to return and repair the wall with concrete not spongy foam sealant. You have a definite problem with stability. If he can't fix it (and most plumbers can't) he needs to pull that plumbing out of the lateral part of that wall and mount it on the outside and hire a concrete mason to repair the wall on his dime. Not acceptable.
 
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Old 10-20-13, 04:22 AM
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Who's idea was it to cut the block? The plumber should have known better! As Larry said, the wall should have been built out to accommodate the drain pipe. The rebar is in the footer and probably the corners [vertically]

btw - welcome to the forums Rick!
 
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Old 10-21-13, 08:44 PM
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Wait you're saying he actually cut all the way through the cinderblock? I have seen plenty of hollow cinderblock construction in the interior but it doesnt actually cut all the way through the cinderblock.

You're in Florida and you have no insulation or anything in between the drywall and cinderblock? That's weird to me.
 
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Old 10-22-13, 04:12 AM
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I believe only one side of the block is cut but that still dramatically reduces it's strength.
The insulation is installed between the furring strips and then a vapor barrier over the entire wall.
 
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Old 01-28-14, 07:28 AM
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Rick, did you have him move your laundry area? I am trying to figure out why the old water lines come in through bottom of exterior block wall unless there is more basement beyond that wall. Why such a large diameter drain? If that is for draining the washtub and/or washer, it is usually 1-1/2" drain. And why didn't the plumber tie this drain into main waste unless that is what they call "overhead" sewer. If that is exterior wall, did he dig up line outside to tie new line into it? If so, he could have just run the line straight out the wall and turned it outside to reconnect to the existing line outside. It makes no sense what is shown to be done in the photos. There were other better options no matter what the conditions. For instance, if your main waste line is overhead (meaning it exits the house somewhere higher up the foundation wall instead of down through the floor and then under the wall) they have a laundry ejector pit and pump which allows the laundry to gravity drain into the pit which sits on the floor and pumps the waste uphill through a line that ties into the overhead main waste. I also would not have tied back into those water supply lines at the bottom of the wall. It would have been better to eliminate those lines if they are only for the laundry and bring in new supply lines from a more sensible location. If the water heater is also in the basement, it should be relatively simple to drop new lines from there to the laundry. I'm from the north so I guess in Florida they could have dropped those old lines from upstairs running them partways on an exterior wall but I would never do that because of exposure to the elements.
Besides all that, he has created a huge problem involving inevitable major leakage due to hydrostatic pressure which, from what I see in the photos, is already allowing seepage of ground water through the foundation. Because of the intentional destruction of a portion of your foundation wall, you now need to repair or replace the broken blocks, relocate the water supply and drain, and either dig up the wall from outside in order to properly waterproof and repair or install inside drain tile under the slab at the damaged wall or the entire perimeter of the basement to collect the leakage which infiltrates the walls and drain it into existing or new sump pit with pump to eject the water out of the basement above grade through a 1-1/2" PVC line transitioning to a flexible line of the same or larger diameter outside 10' or more away from the foundation making sure it gravity flows away from the foundation when the automatic sump pump shuts off. You might be able to just install a pit and pump at that short damaged wall and when the concrete is repaired around the hole from the pit pitch it so any leakage from that wall will drain directly into the pit so it can't collect on the floor to damage property and cause more mold and mildew issues.
Besides all THAT, the damage creates other possible issues involving radon infiltration and the already visible mold and/or mildew problems which may have existed prior to the plumbing work but is or will be exacerbated by that work. Someone needs to deal with the environmental hazards before you and your family start wondering why you always feel off or downright seriously ill, especially if any of you already suffer from allergies.
Next time, ask to see evidence of jobs completed under similar circumstances before hiring, even if it is pictures because pictures like you posted should never get that guy a job like that.
 
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