Rental Rooters

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Old 10-31-13, 11:54 AM
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Question Rental Rooters

Hello,

My kitchen sink drains down from the first floor, through the basement into a 2 inch(I think) pipe in the foundation. Recently, it has begun gurgling when it is draining, which happened before and was solved by having a plumber come out and use his rooter to clear what he said was some oil.

I was hoping to rent a rooter from Home Depot (Plumbing Rental Equipment - Plumbing Tool Rental*at The Home Depot) instead of paying someone else to come out and do this for a lot more money. I also have some sink/tub drains that are a little slow also and I am curious if I get the mini rooter would I be able to use that (probably with the optional 1/2 inch line) on the drains from the actual plumbing fixtures.

If I can, I'd rather take care of all of these drains at once. Would this work safely for the small fixture drains and the larger main drains? Thanks in advance for any advice.
 
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Old 10-31-13, 03:53 PM
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I think you want one with a cutter on the end. A half inch snake isn't going to help with the caked on goop that collects on pipes. I don't have much experience with them (I've always called someone to do it)... so I can't give you too many details.
 
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Old 10-31-13, 05:31 PM
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Have you removed & cleaned the trap under the sink?

If you've had a plumber out before and they mentioned grease/oil you could be in for a job. Grease is probably the worst thing for drain lines and can be very difficult to remove. Snaking can be a messy job. Whenever possible I work outside the home snaking into the house. The mess is outside and any debris broken free is washed downstream. If the drain line for your sink goes straight back into the wall it may be difficult getting started because of the sharp bend inside the wall. If trying to do it yourself for the first time I would recommend rubber gloves and keep your mouth shut...

But seriously. Before starting I'd do a little searching online to understand how houses are usually plumbed. When snaking you will run into T's and other fittings that may make you thing you've reached the end. I'm not saying it's rocket science but skill and experience can be a big help. It may be better to hire a professional.

Since this has happened before and grease/oil was mentioned you need to seriously look at your cooking, cleaning and grease handling. Your actions do have consequences. Some can live in a house their entire life without clogging a drain line while others have it happen regularly. Everyone says they don't fry or use a lot of oil and nobody ever admits to pouring grease down the drain but it does matter. Even if you don't pour a skillet of grease down the drain the film left on plates can cause trouble over time.
 
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Old 11-01-13, 09:36 AM
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I believe the rooters from Home Depot do include different tips, one of which should be the cutter you refer to.

For the kitchen sink, where the main problem is, I have cleaned the trap and the pipe in the basement all the way down to the floor is clear as well. It's under the floor that is the problem. Last time, I bought myself a manual 25 foot snake, but that didn't do the job, either it wasn't long enough or because it just goes in and out, rather than rotating to get the entire pipe like a rooter, it didn't break up enough of the clog.

I don't think that outside the home is an option for this, I am not aware of a cleanout outside the house. My house is fairly far back from the street, where the main shutoff is, so even if there is a cleanout there, going from there probably won't work. My basement is unfinished concrete floor and has a floor drain though, so I am not too concerned about making a mess down there.

One of the other drains that is slow though, I do not have access to the trap. It is a custom tub with marble sheets framed around the tub. I don't actually know that there is a trap inside there, but I would hope so. I can probably remove them to find out, but worry about getting them back on and would rather not unless I have to. If I were to do this one, I'd need to start from the actual drain in the tub. Is that OK?

After last time I definitely adjusted my behavior with the grease/oil, but apparently not aggressively enough. I don't pour stuff down when cooking, but, hadn't put any thought into grease that could be on the plate, which is a possibility.
 
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Old 11-01-13, 03:35 PM
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I often bit the bullet and dig a hole and install a cleanout outside the home. If the clog is pretty severe then I fill the lines in the house with water. Then when working from outside the pressure of the water trapped in the house is helping push the clog out. Since you have an unfinished basement that's a good place to work. Just buy some good rubber gloves and keep your mouth shut. As you work keep in mind how the drain lines might be run. "If the drain is going this way but my main line is over there" expect to feel angle fittings along the way so don't stop when you first feel resistance.

If you can't readily access the tub's trap a small hand crank snake will work well for that section. T
 
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